Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,957   Posts: 1,586,083   Online: 959
      
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    DeanC's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Mill Valley, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    342

    Pouring the developer

    Noob question time.

    Everything I read tells me that you need to pour the developer over your Pd/Pt prints, not just slide the paper into it like you do with silver but I haven't found anything that says why. So, I'll ask you folks:

    What bad thing happens if you just leave the developer in the tray and slide the prints in?

    Thanks,
    Dean

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    State College, PA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    336
    Dean,

    I have never seen a difference. I pour because I use the developer at 120 degrees, and so I get it up to temperature in a puoring container, not in the tray.

    I have slipped a print into a tray before, and not seen any adverse effects.

    I think the more important issue is getting the entire print into the developer in a rapid, uniform manner. If the developer stops advancing over the print while you are submersing it (regardless of the method), you may end up with a discontinuity in the resultant print density that will not disappear, no matter how long you leave it in the developer.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Missouri
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    171
    Dean,
    Nothing bad will happen if you can slide the print into the tray in a nice smooth motion. If you don't and get kind of hung up you can fold the print, especially on thin papers. Some have reported getting a surge mark if print is not fully covered instantly. I heat my developer so it just makes it easier to have the developer in a container on the hot plate and pour it over the print then pour back in container to bring back to temp. I think the surge mark problem is most likely using developer heated to 100 degrees or more.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Missouri
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    171
    Sorry Michael I didn't hear you typing.

  5. #5
    Stan. L-B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    London & Friars Cliff Dorset UK
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    342
    Images
    1
    Hello Dean.
    As is with most alternative processes there are no hard and fast rules. The Pd/Pt
    processes are costly and I suspect the reason why some go for the pour method which uses less chemicals than the slide under method.

    It is worth experimenting
    to find which method suits your particular modus operandi.

    The mixing of p/t & P/d should take place at least twelve hours before use, with the contrast controlled by temp, and or clearing bath, to suit the support.
    'Determine on some course more than a wild exposure to each chance' The Bard.

  6. #6
    cjarvis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    183
    Images
    26
    As a point of reference, Dick Arentz cites both methods as acceptable in his book.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin