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  1. #11
    Gadfly_71's Avatar
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    I see at least one flaw with the plan to mix cyanotype chemistry with paint. I don't see how you're going to wash out the residual (unexposed) chemistry once the exposure is made. Coating on canvas or muslin and making "wallpaper" would be the way to go. (To coat large swaths of fabric or paper, artists usually mix up gallons of cyano solution and then submerge the substrate in the solution using buckets, drums or large tubs.)

    I suppose you could try this:
    * Coat the wall with gesso (or similar)
    * Apply a coating of cyanotype solution
    * Expose
    * Wash
    * Coat with clear varnish or polyurethane

    Of course, making sure you don't flood the place is of primary concern. You will have the same issue should you attempt the Lumi Inkodyes.

  2. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Well, I have another suggestion.

    If you usually coat 10 ml per square foot, then mix it 50:50 with gelatin + hardener and then coat at 20 mg / square foot. Coverage will be the same. Process, wash and dry. The results shuld be the same. (they were when I did this!!!!)

    PE

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadfly_71 View Post
    I see at least one flaw with the plan to mix cyanotype chemistry with paint. I don't see how you're going to wash out the residual (unexposed) chemistry once the exposure is made. Coating on canvas or muslin and making "wallpaper" would be the way to go. (To coat large swaths of fabric or paper, artists usually mix up gallons of cyano solution and then submerge the substrate in the solution using buckets, drums or large tubs.)

    I suppose you could try this:
    * Coat the wall with gesso (or similar)
    * Apply a coating of cyanotype solution
    * Expose
    * Wash
    * Coat with clear varnish or polyurethane

    Of course, making sure you don't flood the place is of primary concern. You will have the same issue should you attempt the Lumi Inkodyes.

    the inkodyes don't require any additional processing, or developing or chemistry ...
    you just paint it on, and the sun changes the color ...

    it is just a little pricey ...

  4. #14
    Gadfly_71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    the inkodyes don't require any additional processing, or developing or chemistry ...
    you just paint it on, and the sun changes the color ...

    it is just a little pricey ...
    Still requires a washout. From the Inkodye "How to Use" section;
    Rinse your project:
    After the Inkodye has finished developing in the sunlight, move to a shaded or darker area to rinse your project. We recommend rinsing first with warm water, washing with laundry detergent and hot water, and then rinsing again, to ensure that the excess dye has been removed. When creating photographic prints, be sure to agitate the print thoroughly while washing.

    Wash up:
    Wash up with warm soapy water. If you happen to get some developed dye on your skin we recommend using Reduran hand cleaner.
    Last edited by Gadfly_71; 03-11-2012 at 11:44 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadfly_71 View Post
    Still requires a washout. From the Inkodye "How to Use" section;
    cool, thanks !

    i watched her make ruby slippers, and they must have omitted the wash out

    john

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