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  1. #1

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    Sep 2003
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    flashing the pt/pd print

    Curious if pt/pd (or kallitype) printers ever flash their prints? I have used flashing on occasion with AZO. I have been using COT-320 and since it is brighter than some of the other papers, I thought flashing might be helpful on occasion. Whereas with the less bright papers I thought flashing might dull the highlights.

  2. #2
    nze
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    I did some flashing for a work I've done for a nude photographer. In fact he used to photograph nude in front of white back ground and he want to get a light brown tone instead of a pure white so I flash . It also can be helpul .

    when I do this I put my coated paper at 2meter of a Uv source and give it a 10 to 20 seconds exposure with my BL lamp.
    Chris Nze
    me Apug Portfolio
    Me web page

  3. #3

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    Phil,

    It's possible, as Christian can attest, but in most cases I don't think it is necessary because of the already extremely long toe to the response curve. That makes it difficult to actually blow out the highlights unless you have really missed the DR in the negative.

    Using no restrainer in pt/pd is often essentially the same thing, because unless you have absolutely new FO, you will get a little fog that will extend the toe curve even further.

    I see flashing as a procedure that helps extend the toe on papers or films that have a fairly short toe. That is certainly not the case with pt/pd, so I don't think the procedure is as useful as it is with silver printing. However, it is a tool in the bag of tricks, so on a problem negative it may be an approach that could produce a superior result.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.



 

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