Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,711   Posts: 1,548,661   Online: 1155
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Shooter
    35mm Pan
    Posts
    23

    Hostile cyanotype enviroment

    As the title suggests I have a problem with cyanotypes. All papers in my area are buffered and the water in my area could qualify as liquid rock. Is there any hope for this process for me. I have tried acidifying both paper and the water but prints still keep on fading away. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Have you added a splash of hydrogen peroxide? That plus final rinse with DI water, after that there's just toning...

    This old article may help:

    http://web.simmons.edu/~benoit/AIC/b...evaluation.pdf
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Istanbul, Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    650
    Quiver, before commenting, I'd like to learn (a.) how have you acidified your paper and water and (b.) what paper do you use?

    The best method for acidifying the paper is to *not do it at all*, I mean just use something else; most cheap / student grade papers aren't buffered. (Usually...)

    Regards,
    Loris.

  4. #4
    Ironage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ronan, MT
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    24
    Yup, got that problem in my town. My solution is using a first developer of distilled vinegar. Just use it until the blue is clear and then wash in tap water after. Best results ever.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by quiver View Post
    As the title suggests I have a problem with cyanotypes. All papers in my area are buffered and the water in my area could qualify as liquid rock. Is there any hope for this process for me. I have tried acidifying both paper and the water but prints still keep on fading away. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    I've made many hundreds of cyanotypes in central Florida where the water is quite hard. After testing many papers, I've settled on Arches Aquarelle water color paper as a decent paper that gives good results. You should be able to find that readily. I add 1/2 gram of oxalic acid (wood bleach at the hardware store) to each 100 ml. of solutions A and B to help counteract the effects of alkaline water. Have you measured your water's ph level? That would help offer meaningful advice and allow meaningful comparisons to other's working conditions.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Shooter
    35mm Pan
    Posts
    23
    I attempted to acidify by coating white vinegar with a foam brush. After this dried the paper smelled neutral or at least not acid. Added vinegar to water. I have a softener but that only exchanges Na for Ca and Mg. I used Southworth Cotton Paper and GP card stock. I might try Crayola watercolor/marker paper later. Wal-Mart and Staples are my only paper sources around here.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Shooter
    35mm Pan
    Posts
    23
    Willl,

    Never heard or seen that paper around here. Where do you find it in your area. It might give me a clue where to look.
    Last edited by quiver; 06-06-2012 at 05:28 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: redundant information

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Istanbul, Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    650
    Quiver, try to acidify the paper with 1+30 diluted (in case of 30-35%) hydrochloric (muriatic) acid, it's more effective. Also, develop in drinking water and only then rinse in normal tap water. (Which - maybe - was gently acidified with a pinch of citric acid / few drops of hydrochloric acid...) Again, don't acidify paper if you aren't absolutely sure that it is alkaline buffered indeed, and still, opt to source non-buffered papers instead of acidification. (Student grade papers usually aren't buffered...)

    Hope this helps,
    Loris.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6
    Lois Medici, FWIW, our studio's paper supplier/wholesale sale agents tell us that pretty much every paper made these days is alkaline buffered with calcium carbonate. Dr. Mike Ware's alt photography website talks at length about the difficulties of finding non-buffered papers and how the St. Cuthbert's Mill papers were specifically formulated to get around this too common malady with modern papers. Modern papermakers have had to change the chemistry of the paper making process to comply with environmental laws in most countries. From what I've read, it used to be that paper making took place in an acidic environment that made great paper but created environmentally problematic acidic effluent. Today's papermaking process is more environmentally benign but the paper requires alkaline buffering to remain ph neutral over time. I've verified this with Arche's paper mill's representives, they assured me that the Arches Aquarelle is indeed alkaline buffered.

    Quiver, if you are going to have success with cyanotype, you're going to have to mail order your supplies it seems. Staples and Walmart aren't going to have any paper suitable for making alt photography processes. Any mail order art supply place will carry Arches papers. Daniel Smith, Utrecht, Dick Blick, Cheap Joes, all of these businesses supply Arches. I've found cold press watercolor paper to work better than hot press if you want an even coating and deep blues. However, for photographs with fine detail, hot press gives better resolution. If you need to order chemicals, I order from artcraftchemicals.com, Bostick & Sullivan, or The Photographer's Formulary. BTW, swabbing vinegar over paper and letting dry isn't going to acidify paper, that's too weak to do any good. Something stronger like Lois Medici suggest is called for. (You can easily get hydrochloric acid in the concentration he mentions, it's sold as "Muriatic Acid" in hardware stores and swimming pool supply stores.) The advice to use non-alkaline water to develop and tap water to rinse is good advice. (In my studio practice, I can't do this practically though, as we tend to work too large to do this. We regularly make cyanotypes up to 51" x 8 feet in length. Thus the need to acidify the paper with oxalic acid.)

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Istanbul, Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    650
    WillL, not every paper is alkaline buffered actually. For instance: Canson Montval, Awagami Masa, Weston Diploma Parchment, Fabriano Disegno 5, Whatman Watercolor, Bergger COT 320 are papers that did great cyanotypes for me - I mean w/o any extra acidification step...

    Regards,
    Loris.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin