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  1. #11
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    Perry- Good point on the chemistry, although I used it again today. It seemed to work fine, but I probably won't use it again.
    I thought the Kentmere was only available in glossy which, I thought, isn't supposed to be good for bromoil.

    Clive- I've read so many different ways of doing bromoils. I'm just fumbling my way through the learning process. I've read of soaking the matrix at temps between 68-85 degrees... using a normal print to a low contrast one... printing the original up to 50-100% darker... soaking from 5 minutes to 45 minutes... Are you starting with a darker, softer print?
    Eddie, I would start with a very soft print (low contrast), not necessarily darker than normal, but one that is so soft it would be unacceptable as a normal print. You ideally want to work with a non-super coated paper, which is why I used Kentmere document art, but don't think they make it anymore. Pre-soak the print in water before inking and then wash and ink again as necessary. This pre-soaking is very important, as is the temperature of the water (I think I used about 72°F). This is because the Bromoil worker is now dealing with the physical attributes of the print and not the chemical. Therefore the amount of swelling within the gelatin layer will have a direct effect on the way in which ink is taken up. I think the process has some similar properties to lithography and so I used black or brown lithographic ink, sometimes mixing them. I haven't made a bromoil for some years now, as some of the chemicals are quite nasty. Please be careful.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Way View Post
    Diluted it doesn't last for months. :
    well - mine does work well a loong time after diluting. (as said, I sometimes add a little extra dichromate, but that's it..)

    Thanks for your reply.

    Here in DK ALL raw chemistry is a hazzle to get! "Normal" people cant! Period. But if you have a VAT number, then it is possible...

    (this has made me abandon even the thought of making wet plate... OMG... those chemicals... KCN? not in a million years...)

    All the hazzle makes me sometimes want to seek photographic asylum in the States... It seems so easy over there....

  3. #13
    eddie's Avatar
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    Well, I just posted one in the gallery. I used a print with too much contrast, I think. It's fun, though.

  4. #14

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    Um, I'm not really sure where you guys are looking to get your chemistry for this process but it can easily be obtained through David Lewis' website. Paper, chemistry and even some of the tools commonly used for this process are for sale on his site. Just send him an email: dlewis@onlink.net and he'll set you up.

    From my experience, the bleach gets exhausted pretty quickly. Not talking about stock, but the diluted form used to bleach the prints. It usually lasted me about 6-8 8x10 prints. But I'm not even sure you're using the same bleaching method I did. I used a combination of 70ml of a 10% copper sulphate solution, 70ml of a 10% potassium bromide solution and 30ml of a 10% potassium dichromate solution. Keep these 3 separate until you need the bleaching step. Then mix into 1 liter of water to complete the bleach.

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