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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Can light or radiation have an effect on ferromagnetism, to a degree that it could be utilized in some fashion to make an image? I'm kind of thinking along the lines of Xerox; where a charged plate of selenium loses that charge with light exposure. Any kind of similar phenomenon we can exploit with magnetism?
    Curie effect.

  2. #22
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Nickel is magnetic, and nickel isn't iron.
    Never said that it wasn't.

    In fact, the AlNiCo magnet was one of the strongest until recent advances in materials science passed it up. I don't know what the leader is now.

    Under very high magnetic force, it has been demonstrated that most objects are magnetic. In fact, a recent demo on TV showed a spider suspended in a chamber, in mid air, by a huge magnetic field.

    The electromagnetic forces allow electrons to create magnetic fields and magnetic fields create electricity. This has been known for hundreds of years, and was demonstrated by Benjamin Franklin among others. These fields can influence radiation, but they cannot influence light. Gravity can influence light, but there is no electrogravitic force or magnetogravitic force (as once was thought) that can combine all 3 forces and allow control over light, magnetiism and electricity.

    PE

  3. #23

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    Faraday Effect

    Put "Faraday Effect" into Wikipedia, and go from there.
    It's been known almost as long as photography.
    Not the easiest way to modulate an image, I think ...

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Nickel is magnetic, and nickel isn't iron.
    And cobalt.


    Steve.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    These fields can influence radiation, but they cannot influence light. PE
    But can they influence chemical reaction?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #26
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    Using the Faraday Effect, you might have some interaction between magnetism and light, but not with the emulsion itself. Generally, except for a few carefully controlled situations, magnetism does not influence chemical reactions. But, why don't you try it yourself?

    PE

  7. #27

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    You could also try the Surface Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect - otherwise known as SMOKE -
    but you might also need some MIRRORS...

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