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  1. #11
    Herzeleid's Avatar
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    Well, it certainly looks ok, I am glad you nailed it. 30 mins may be a bit overexposed as you said, considering that there is no paper base white , but I believe that is personal matter of choice.

    Loris is very right, some sort step wedge is very very useful to determine correct exposures, it would save you from a lot of trouble.

    BTW I want to share my experience with brushes, I feel that the brush will always cause contamination, black dots, irregular densities, distracting patterns and so on, no matter how careful you are.
    A glass rod/puddle pusher is perfect for Salt print. If you decide to include gelatin in future, a glass rod would save you from lots of troubles.

    Regards

  2. #12
    Uncle Goose's Avatar
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    I use foam brushes at the moment, I bought some new ones and will dedicate them only to salt print, that might solve the contamination problem for the largest part. We'll see in the future. Thanx for all the useful info everybody put in here.
    Sure, I could give you a boring explanation who I really am but I rather let the Origami do the talking.

  3. #13
    Gadfly_71's Avatar
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    A few things you may want to look into:

    - Buffered papers can cause problems, odd color shifts, etc. Finding a good unbuffered paper will aid considerably (the lighter the better too)

    - Have a negative with the correct tonal scale. Good negatives for salt should be nearly unprintable in silver even with the softest contrast grade.

    - Avoid tap water in the first wash. Chlorinated water can have undesirable effects on your prints. After the print is toned and fixed, final wash in tap water is fine.

    - Straight Hypo works fine without any additives. I normally use 1 heaping tablespoon of crystals to 1 liter (or 1 quart) of distilled water

    - Toning (especially with a gold chloride solution) will help, not only with permanence but also with final color

    - Rod coating is fine, but a good Hake, sable, or camel brush works well too. I've never had good luck with foam brushes.

    YMMV

  4. #14
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadfly_71 View Post
    Straight Hypo works fine without any additives.
    William Henry Fox Talbot would not agree, but perhaps I refer to photogenic drawings rather than present day salt prints.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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