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  1. #1

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    Kurare R-1130 polymer for cyanotype on glass

    Has anyone tried using Kurare R-1130 polymer (Bostick & Sullivan has it) instead of gelatine for cyanotype on glass?

  2. #2

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    Looks like it's hydrophobic. See here... It says "water resistant" which doesn't sound nice for our emulsions. What for B&S lists this material? You better ask them before committing...

    Regards,
    Loris.

    EDIT: Seems like a nice material for dichromate processes though; it says it's crosslinkable, sounds much like Mowiol 4-88 (albeit with a higher hydrolysis ratio 98-99, Mowiol is 88...), some use Mowiol as a gum replacement, perhaps this material could be used the same way?
    Last edited by Loris Medici; 11-30-2012 at 04:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #3
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    FYI -- water resistant doesn't mean hydrophobic. It may or may not. Glass is pretty hydrophyllic but is definitely water proof! A thin coat of wax is very hydrophobic and not all that water resistant. Call Bostick and ask them. They are friendly folk.

    Mark
    Your first 10,000 pictures are the worst - HCB

    www.markjamesfisher.com

  4. #4
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    See

    http://www.apug.org/forums/archive/i...p/t-93625.html

    The proper name is Kuraray Poval http://www.poval.jp/english/poval/s_grades/sg_r.html

    Crudely put, the stuff is Elmer's Glue and Silane; but don't try and make it yourself from these two ingredients...

    Google for "Kuraray" and other catch words: apug, cyanotype, photographic ...
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 11-30-2012 at 11:08 AM. Click to view previous post history.
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  5. #5

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    Great info Nicholas, I should have missed that one! Good to know about this material, looks very promising...

    Regards,
    Loris.

  6. #6

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    Kuraray R-1130

    Hi Nicholas,

    Thank you very much. Mea culpa. It is Kuraray Poval R-1130. I am familiar with the information you suggested. Two or three years ago those guys (DPvisions and wildbillbugman) used Kuraray R-1110 that is not manufactured any more. They also mentioned that Bostick & Sullivan would sell it. At Kuraray they told me that R-1130 is the latest version. At B&S they did order it (R-1130) two or three years ago but forgot about it. They sent me a sample. By now they should have it on their site.
    I followed those guys instructions , made 5% aqueous solution, coated the glass, baked at 225 degrees F, but cayanotype emulsion would not stick. That's why
    I am asking if anyone else tried it instead of gelatin.

  7. #7

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    I have been able to print cyanotype images on glass using several type of Polyvinyl Alcohol(PVOH). I have used the Poval R-1130 as a base subbing which provides tenacious adhesion to glass and a much more suitable interface for other PVOH grades that do not have silane in them. Once the intial R-1130 is dry and hard I apply another coating of Kuraray Mowiol 4-88, boric acid, and a fumed alpha alumina dispersion. This second coating readily accepts and holds a cyanotype coating much better than a plain PVOH coating.

    I am still working on the formulation that provides a consistent reliable print, some issues of very fine cracking/crazing of the coating occurs which I am hoping to fix and tweaking ration of the mixture to best optimize. Also working out ways to get a clean consistent coating which is necessary for consistency in image density.

    Cheers,
    David

  8. #8

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    cyanotype on glass

    Dear David,

    My task was to put cyanotype image on glass and protect it from elements and damage. First, I thought of using gelatin as a substrate (sand or etch glass if
    necessary) and sandwich with another piece of glass. Then I came across your experiment with Kuraray R-1110 and thought it would make my life much easier: coat glass with polymer, bake it, coat with cyanotype emulsion, expose, process, dry, put another coat of polymer, bake it and get a reasonably well protected image on glass.
    Kuraray R-1130 is a totally different beast. It is reactivity with inorganic substances that make it water resistant. I'll be very much obliged if you could share
    some specifics of you experience.

    Best regards,

    Victor altphotoproducts@gmail.com

  9. #9

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    Victor, if you plan to seal the cyanotype to protect it physically, mind that it needs a small supply of oxygen to regenerate from the damaging effect (fading) due UV exposure, or has to be perfectly protected from UV light. I mean the seal has to be permeable to air, or perfectly protect the image from UV light. If not, you MAY loose the image (or experience unacceptable levels of fading) in the long term, due cumulative effect of UV light to the image - if it wasn't given the chance to repair itself... Framed cyanotypes normally have fading / regeneration cycles; some fading occurs when the image is subjected to UV light, then the image partly regenerates in the dark by the action of oxygen trapped inside the frame.

    Regards,
    Loris.

  10. #10

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    Victor, when I get back in town next week I will collect up my notes and post some formulations that I have had success with. Also are you interested in having the cyanotype image on a transparent sheet of glass or can the support be opaque?

    Cheers,
    David

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