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  1. #21

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    too bad steve couldn't make with nobel gasses ( under pressure and in a vacuum ) and phosphoric dyes
    and electrified to make holographic light images, like brilliant lit kirilian / thoughtograms

  2. #22
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    IDK what the dyes were. I do know that they were rare earth complexes that were colorless under visible illumination. There was a tiny amount of image due to ambient UV, but when we turned out the room lights and turned on a fluorescent lamp directed towards the paper, it came alive like a flat screen TV in an age well before such devices.

    At that time, we were working on metallized dyes for image stability and did get a whole series that were based on nickle complexes which is another story completely. In this case, a magenta dye would turn into a cyan dye upon contact with a mordant and a nickle salt. Thus, we proved that magenta did not exist!

    PE

  3. #23
    CMB
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    Adrian LeRoy, who developed the "Lerochrome" one-shot color camera in 1938, did quite a bit of work with "secret" map processes that used fluorescent and phosphorescent color emulsions that were "invisible" unless exposed to UV light. According to the 1946 Industrial Research Laboratories of America , his research included the "subtraction of the visible spectrum colors from uranium nitrate and the application of color photography".


    BTW His "Leriomystic" solution, which promised "absolutely invisible pictures", was an early(1927) attempt to commercialize his research in this area.

    Charles

  4. #24
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    Photos based on Uranyl salts were easily detected by Geiger counters. These are not.

    IDK what the history of any of this was as I did not follow up.

    PE

  5. #25
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Some young people uses fluorescent dyes to tattoo themselves. I heard one guy ordered a skull tattoo to his face and when he goes to disco , everyone sees the skull on his face under ultraviolet light

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    Some young people uses fluorescent dyes to tattoo themselves. I heard one guy ordered a skull tattoo to his face and when he goes to disco , everyone sees the skull on his face under ultraviolet light
    hey umut

    i think that was an episode of the x-files ( a long running conspiracy based tv show )
    fox and scully were investigating radioactive tattoo inks which were
    mined deep in russia, and deposited by aliens
    i can't remember how the show ended up, except for the smoking man smirked
    and chrizchec's eyes looked all black.

    no disco's just scifi fun

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    IDK what the dyes were. I do know that they were rare earth complexes that were colorless under visible illumination. There was a tiny amount of image due to ambient UV, but when we turned out the room lights and turned on a fluorescent lamp directed towards the paper, it came alive like a flat screen TV in an age well before such devices.

    At that time, we were working on metallized dyes for image stability and did get a whole series that were based on nickle complexes which is another story completely. In this case, a magenta dye would turn into a cyan dye upon contact with a mordant and a nickle salt. Thus, we proved that magenta did not exist!

    PE
    Ah HAH!!! I've learned part of the history from the deleted thread!! Finally I feel like I'm "in the know" haha, now if I could only figure out the rest...

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by falotico View Post
    It is wonderful to have access to the experts from Kodak. This fluorescent image that PE mentions would have been fascinating to see. If it was a dye-transfer image then Frizza could acquire a dye-transfer relief matrix some way and simply use it to transfer a fluorescent dye onto print paper. You could try it with fluorescein dye which can be bought online in various forms. Fluorescein looks like it is a basic dye so it might require a mordant on the print paper in order to transfer well--perhaps chrome alum? Other fluorescent dyes include Rhodamine which comes in two forms, one of which is available in art stores. You might also use a dye-toning method to create a photographic image in fluorescent dye, cf. J.S. Friedman "History of Color Photography." If Frizza is really interested in fluorescent images he might find it easier to start off with the materials commercially available than try to find compounds made of rare earths.

    Try drawing with the dyes also. This will give you a sense of what the fluorescent images look like.
    The Reason I don't want to initially start trying with fluorescein dye or the other commercially available products is because I'm not after something that renders a semi accurate colour or a basic rendition of reality Iam more interested in achieving a good natural luminescent colour from a totally clear / invisible coating.
    as was hinted in this test.

    PE one question I have is when such test items were made did kodak have a vault for all these such test items to be filed and cataloged if not simply for future reference? As in could the actual example you saw exist stored in a vault somewhere? I simply ask because I keep a process diary and often file away the more important things i make in tests. I wonder if kodak does the same of only keeps written records of their experimental items?
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  9. #29
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    hey umut

    i think that was an episode of the x-files ( a long running conspiracy based tv show )
    fox and scully were investigating radioactive tattoo inks which were
    mined deep in russia, and deposited by aliens
    i can't remember how the show ended up, except for the smoking man smirked
    and chrizchec's eyes looked all black.

    no disco's just scifi fun
    I read the story at an tattoo magazine from australia. I know the show. I will pm you.

  10. #30
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    Steve;

    An example might exist. Kodak does keep an archive, but only certain things are archived. For example, the formula might exist but not the actual print. IDK.

    Sorry.

    PE

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