Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,693   Posts: 1,482,431   Online: 788
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33
  1. #1
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,367
    Images
    174

    Question for Emulsion Engineers

    I once heard Reference to an emulsion which was coated on glass and once developed was clear and colorless to the human eye yet under ultra violet light produced an image in full color. I suspect it was an obscure Kodak experiment that never got further then R&D can anyone shed any light on this? or know of any similar themed experiments in emulsion and imagine making?
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  2. #2
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,710
    Images
    65
    Pretty close Steve.

    It was like a dye transfer process in which no dyes were used. Instead, complexes of heavy metals were transferred imagewise onto a sheet of mordant which continued to look just like a blank sheet of paper. When hit with UV, the pigments fluoresced and gave a brilliant color image.

    I saw exactly one example, and it was indeed an R&D experiment that never went further than this one demo.

    PE

  3. #3
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,367
    Images
    174
    is there any published patents with this R&D? I am wanting to bring this obscure process to life.
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  4. #4
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,710
    Images
    65
    Steve;

    I know who did the work, and I just did a patent search and turned up nothing even close. Well, yes, kind of. He did some work on UV absorbers in that time frame, but that is a total miss. So, I would guess it was never patented or published unless as a Defensive Publication or something like that.

    PE

  5. #5
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,438
    In modern printing luminescent dyes are used. Either to obscure information or to enhance the image quality.

  6. #6
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,438
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    When hit with UV, the pigments fluoresced and gave a brilliant color image.
    "Brilliant colour" does not necessarily refer to a natural colour image.

  7. #7
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,710
    Images
    65
    Alright, "Natural Color" then.

    These dyes were colorless until exposed to UV and then they fluoresced C/M/Y and the image was truly unique and spectacular. It was a "Kodak girl" photo with a MacBeth color checker in the image. Nothing spectacular about the scene, it was the imaging method that was unique.

    PE

  8. #8
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,438
    So, a natural colour image it was? I'm surprised. Such experiment went aside my attention so far.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Penfield, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    So, I would guess it was never patented or published unless as a Defensive Publication or something like that.
    Ron, Did you check RESEARCH DISCLOSURES? A lot of things in the '70s got published there by Kodak.

  10. #10
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,710
    Images
    65
    I have searched patents, Fred. I have not gotten to RDs or Defensive Publications which are rather harder to access and search. It really does not matter as these fluorescent compounds were complexes of things such as Europium and Yttrium or something like that. I had the information at one time, but I did not want to do any work on it due to the cost.

    BTW, good seeing you yesterday Fred. Again, sorry I forgot to call you or E-mail you.

    PE

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin