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  1. #41
    Herzeleid's Avatar
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    Hi Loris,

    Yes I have seen those papers at some stores' online site. My limited experience with the hahnemuehle copperplate gravure paper was exactly as you described, quite absorbent and the surface was slightly damaged /abrased in wet treatment and very good dmax. I am guessing some might have more endurance depending on the printmaking process they are used. I am curious about Stan's choice of paper too

    Regards
    Serdar

    Quote Originally Posted by Loris Medici View Post
    Hi Serdar,

    You can find Hahnemuehle and Magnani printmaking papers here in Istanbul. In my understanding, printmaking papers have less sizing therefore are more absorbent and fragile. OTOH, they have a wider set of color and weight choices, compared to watercolor papers. Maybe Stan can elaborate further about the whys and wherefores of his choice of printmaking papers (BFK in particular) and the specifics of working with them?

    Regards,
    Loris.

  2. #42

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    Hi Serdar,

    Using a glass rod - cut neon tubes with a handle attached (for single handed usage) or bent to U shape (double hand usage) - for applying the emulsion + using a support sheet under the paper in wet development (synthetic Yupo paper works perfect for that kind of job) does really help with the feeble wet strength / easy abrasion issues. But still, these paper are going to need more emulsion, comparatively.

    Regards,
    Loris.

  3. #43
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    Andrew,
    May be 15mins water was was too short so that you had problems, I always do 20 to 25 mins washing, shuffling the papers 5 mins intervals.
    I can't find rising stonehenge here, so I am unable to test it.
    May be there is a problem with the tap water, or with the sulfamic acid (additives perhaps).

    Any case, I will paste my washing regimen from the initial post.
    "I washed the papers (5 of them in the same tray) with tap water (chlorinated, not filtered, measured Ph. 7), for 20-25 minutes with 4-5 changes of water, and with each change of water shuffling the papers and bringing the bottom one to the top. When finished washing, I hanged the papers to dry in the bathroom."

    regards
    Serdar
    Serdar, I'm making kallitypes.
    I gave thorough washing, up to an hour, after my initial trials with the 10% solution. Results were much better. I compared the 1% and 10% prints side-by-side, and they are identical, at least to my eye. 1% worked with Rising Stonehenge. It may not with other papers.

  4. #44
    Herzeleid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew O'Neill View Post
    Serdar, I'm making kallitypes.
    I gave thorough washing, up to an hour, after my initial trials with the 10% solution. Results were much better. I compared the 1% and 10% prints side-by-side, and they are identical, at least to my eye. 1% worked with Rising Stonehenge. It may not with other papers.
    Hi Andrew,

    Do you rinse the papers after %1 SA treatment?

  5. #45
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
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    Yes, I rinse and wash in a tray with a kodak tray syphon hose , for about an hour. Every 10 minutes or so, I move the paper around so none stick to each other.

  6. #46
    Herzeleid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew O'Neill View Post
    Yes, I rinse and wash in a tray with a kodak tray syphon hose , for about an hour. Every 10 minutes or so, I move the paper around so none stick to each other.
    Thank you Andrew, I will try it one of the papers I currently use and prolong the washing time. As you have said %1 SA might work with the specific paper, rising stonehenge in this instance. For example, with FAEW SP it takes nearly 20 mins. until the acid-base reaction stops.

  7. #47
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
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    I'll be curious to hear your results!

  8. #48
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
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    Here is a straight scan of a kallitype print where the paper (Rising Stonehenge) received a pre-bath in 1% sulfamic acid.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hanna RdHouse.jpg  

  9. #49

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    I'm starting a new project and my client wanted to use 90lb paper for tipping in. I have received great results using Arches HP WC paper with the 10% sulfamic treatment. I have always liked this paper but could never get it to work. In my tests w/ sulfamic on the back side of the paper (verso) it has worked out very nicely and predictably repeatable with a Dmax of ~1.42. I do a 20 minute sulfamic soak with agitation and a 10 minute wash. So once again thank you for sharing! Another note that even though I coated w/ just straight Pd and develop in potassium oxalate the tones are quite neutral considering and you could warm up the image if necessary by heating up the P.O.

  10. #50

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    Hi Stan, great news.

    About the colder tone; could be the acid is breaking some of the original size in the paper (or fibres to some extent) and letting the paper retain more moisture than usual, leading to colder tones. Do you get more whisper / printout (and speed) than usual? I noticed that sulfamic acid treated papers become a little more absorbent than non-treated ones...

    Regards,
    Loris.

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