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  1. #1
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Any Fume from Pyro and Dichromate Dangerous

    Do pyro developers and dichromate generate fume in the darkroom dangerous ?

    Umut

  2. #2
    Barry S's Avatar
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    No, both are in aqueous solutions and the dangers of inhalation are very low.

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    mr rusty's Avatar
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    Can I suggest that you shouldn't consider using Dichromate until you have read the MSDS?

    http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9927404

    It's pretty nasty stuff.

  4. #4
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I believe mixing from powder is an issue. And you must be very careful. The chemists here can elaborate with the correct answer.
    I have my pyro made and get it in liquid A and B form and I can say there is no issue using it this way.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    Do pyro developers and dichromate generate fume in the darkroom dangerous ?

    Umut

  5. #5
    Barry S's Avatar
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    A respirator (with the correct cannisters) is a good investment for handling toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic solids, and toxic solvents. I always wear nitrile gloves when working with hazardous materials and yes--always read the MSDS before you work with any chemical.

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    If by pyro you mean pyrogallol then both the powder and solutions are very dangerous. In solution it is rapidly absorbed thru the skin. The LDlo (smallest lethal dose) is 26 mg per kg of body weight. Even in small amounts repeated skin contact should be avoided. Contact with dichromate solutions can cause skin irritation. Ingestion can be fatal in very small amounts. When dealing with the powders wear a respirator and nitrile gloves. With solutions gloves are still required. If possible I would recommend avoiding either chemical.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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    As an aside to this post can everyone please]stop using the word pyro. It is a very old-fashioned term and not a scientific name and is confusing because some people refer to both pyrogallol and catechol by using the same name pyro. So in the future let us all agree to use only accepted chemical names (those recognized by the IUPAC) in this instance pyrogalol and catechol.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 05-28-2013 at 10:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #8
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    As an aside to this post can everyone please]stop using the word pyro. It is a very old-fashioned term and not a scientific name and is confusing because some people refer to both pyrogallol and catechol by using the same name pyro. So in the future let us all agree to use only accepted chemical names (those recognized by the IUPAC) in this instance pyrogalol and catechol.
    I'm an offender of this and will try to make sure I am more specific. I agree, this is quite important.
    K.S. Klain

  9. #9
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Gerald and all Friends ,

    Thank you for all answers ,

    Could you please give me the correct respirator canister numbers for either dichromate and pyrogallol ? And how do they classified and subclassified either in Europe and US ?

    Umut

  10. #10
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Look for canisters that are rated for organic solvents. They should be more than sufficient for pyrogallol, pyrocatechin, and various forms of dichromate/bichromate.

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