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  1. #11
    Davec101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Ley View Post
    I am thinking of going over to the dark side and making digital negatives, but I am not sure where to start with that. I have dabbled in inkjet printing, but always felt that I could get better prints the traditional way as I have a darkroom that is B&W and Color capable. If I were to get a printer such as the Epson 1400 I could devote it to making enlarged negatives and possibly B&W prints. I have read a bit about the Piezography method of Jon Cone and was wondering what members may think of this method for a dedicated printer?

    I guess what I would like to know is what method you use for making enlarged negatives and where on the web I might be able to get some information on making enlarged negatives?
    I will be posting a detailed review of the Jon Cone negative system on my platinum blog in a short while.
    Platinum Printing Editions http://www.dceditions.com
    The Art of Platinum Printing Blog http://artofplatinum.wordpress.com/
    Alternative Photographic Processes blog http://altphotoblog.com/

  2. #12

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    Like Barry, I've used Fuji MI-DUP duplicating film. I bought it from zzmedical. I develop it in the print developer I usually use (Ilford PQ, from the recipe Ian Grant has on this site). It needs exposures from 2-8 minutes, usually. With experience, you can get the contrast right by visual inspection during development, since you can develop it in a tray with a red safelight. This works well for making enlarged negatives I've used for Kallitypes and cyanotypes.

    Mark

  3. #13
    bvy
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    I'm just now getting into cyanotypes and, like you, I wanted to avoid the digital "dark side." (I don't have a very good printer anyway and didn't want to make that investment.) At the moment, I'm getting good internegatives by contact printing finished black and white prints onto Ortho litho film, and developing in a dilute paper developer. The resulting internegative is still somewhat contrasty, but I'm seeing enough information in the midtones to make me want to continue. That aside, the only disadvantage is the extra step of preparing a regular paper print in the desired size (if I don't have one already).

  4. #14

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    I have some very limited experience with digital negatives. They are convenient, and they work pretty well. Not all transparency media are suitable, however. You have a lot of control, but creating and printing these negatives is a different world from traditional photographic methods. Like photographic methods, there are a lot of variables, but they are somewhat different variables and are controlled in quite different ways. Incidentally, you have to do a complete recalibration of your system whenever you change materials, which is more or less true with photographic methods, too. There was a pretty good article on "photo technique" magazine for May/June 2013.

  5. #15

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    Thanks for the info Markos, checked out ZZmedical, and the prices are close to CXS. 2-8 minute exposures does give me pause. What light source are you using and what enlarger? I have a Beseler 45 with a 45s color head. If I can remember I was getting exposures of about 90sec with a 135 lens and wide open at f:5.6 with a 4x5 negative and 8x10 image size.

    bvy... I had never heard of contact printing a print with litho film, but it sounds like it could work. Do you try to control the contrast of the film negative by adjusting the contrast of your paper print? I would think if you had a very flat low contrast print you might be better able to control the contrast of the film negative.

    Thanks all for the great information!

    Robert

  6. #16

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    Robert,

    I have not done any machine processing. Years ago I tried Agfa x-ray duplicating film in the 11x14 size. It was very good but more grain and contrast than Kodak. The original negatives in both were 2 1/4 x 2 1/4. There is also HSI duplicate x-ray film in a 10x12 size but I haven't tried it.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  7. #17

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    Robert,

    I use a Beseler 57 enlarger with Aristo V54 cold light head, generally at f/8, for my 5x7 negatives, or an LPL with color head for my medium format and (rarely) 35mm negatives. I need to use longer exposures, about a factor of two, for the color head compared to the cold light head, for an equivalent enlargement. Your 90 sec at f/5.6 for a 2x enlargement sounds comparable to what I need. The longer exposures are for larger enlargements and/or more dense original negatives.

    Mark

  8. #18
    Barry S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Ley View Post
    Barry, I have some of the BW-65 developer, but haven't really tried it yet. Where do you get your Fuji MI-DUP film? Is it much the same as the Warehouse dupe film? Are all these x-ray dupe films pretty much the same or are some better than others?
    I bought my Fuji MI-DUP on eBay--it was very inexpensive. I haven't tried any other brands, but they're probably similar. The BW-65 is great, I like it for paper and it seems to do a fine job on the MI-DUP. I think you can dial things in with what you have.

  9. #19

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    I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the use of pyro developers for dupe negatives. Bob Herbst describes an elegant process for making dupe negs for alt processes on his web site, www.bobherbst.com. I have been using his method for years and I feel it is the best way to create enlarged negs that I have seen. It is the stain of the Pyro negative which works so well as a UV light resist for alt processes.

  10. #20
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Loss of mid-tones when using lith film is most likely due to developer choice. A huge number of people use diluted paper developer, why escapes me.
    The need is for a softer working developer. Since paper developers are many times more active than are film developers, a diluted film developer makes far more sense. If you don't believe this, try developing paper in full strength film developer.
    Over the years I have used HC110 1+127 from syrup, D-76 diluted 1+4 or 5, D-23, among others. Currently I use Somarkos LC-2 which is superb for this process providing tremendous control over both the positive and the new negative.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

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