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  1. #41
    davido's Avatar
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    It's always been my understanding that print developers are more active than film. As I've been using dektol at a stronger dilution (1:1 and higher) than normal which is typically 1:3, I can't see how normal strength HC-110 will be strong enough or you will have excessively long developing times and very flat negatives. I have been considering looking for more active developer that dektol but dektol is quite reasonable and it does work at strong dilutions.
    In school we used dektol for developing lith film for making negtatives but it was too strong and the negatives were contrasty with little midtones. I'm guessing that the GBX chemistry that Jeffrey uses is more active than dektol as it is optimized for the x-ray dupe?

  2. #42

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    Mixed up some D-72 this evening and tried it 1:1 with my Fuji MI-DUP film and like it a lot. Good maximum density and shadow detail. I am going to try this developer with a couple of ml of 10%KBr to try to increase the contrast.


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  3. #43
    davido's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Ley View Post
    Mixed up some D-72 this evening and tried it 1:1 with my Fuji MI-DUP film and like it a lot. Good maximum density and shadow detail. I am going to try this developer with a couple of ml of 10%KBr to try to increase the contrast.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    Robert, from what I've read D-72 is virtually the same as Dektol. How long are developing for? I found that pre-soaking is necessary just to remove the anti-halation backing and so that when the film hits the developer, it spreads quicker.

  4. #44

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    I have been developing for about 3mins, but would probably develop a little longer with a pre-soak. My decision to use D-72 was expedient in that my mixed Dektol was beat. I read in the "Darkroom Cookbook" that adding a couple of cc's of 10% KBr would increase the contrast in cold tone paper and thought it might help with the DUP film. Will try the press-soak and see how it works.


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  5. #45
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
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    Have you ever tried D-19. I use it a lot to make Efke IR and HP5 negatives print in carbon transfer. I also dabbled with x-ray (14X17 double-sided, green latitude) as a dupe film a couple of years ago and was pleased with the results. Dilute the stock 1:1 to 1:3.

  6. #46
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I've tried this method with Fuji HRT.

    http://www.thewebdarkroom.com/?p=675

    I process the neg under a red safelight.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  7. #47
    davido's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    I've tried this method with Fuji HRT.

    http://www.thewebdarkroom.com/?p=675

    I process the neg under a red safelight.
    Seems like an easy way to do it but I can't see it producing a very sharp negative?

  8. #48
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    It's not bad

    Quote Originally Posted by davido View Post
    Seems like an easy way to do it but I can't see it producing a very sharp negative?
    It's not bad. It is a contact similar to a contact print. I think OHP film and an ink jet printer gives greater control and better sharpness.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  9. #49
    davido's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    It's not bad. It is a contact similar to a contact print. I think OHP film and an ink jet printer gives greater control and better sharpness.
    You may be correct about the control with digi-negs but printing onto film is much sharper from my experience. I was getting amazingly sharp enlarged negatives with lith film but the control issue was the problem.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew O'Neill View Post
    Have you ever tried D-19. I use it a lot to make Efke IR and HP5 negatives print in carbon transfer. I also dabbled with x-ray (14X17 double-sided, green latitude) as a dupe film a couple of years ago and was pleased with the results. Dilute the stock 1:1 to 1:3.
    Andrew, is the Efke IR the ISO 25 (?) speed. I have a couple hundred sheets in the refrigerator in 11x14. I've never used it, is D19 pretty much required for carbon printing? I was going to use Pyrocat HD. Does D19 produce usable carbon negatives? I've heard it suggested many times.

    Thanks,
    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

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