Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,200   Posts: 1,531,492   Online: 947
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4
    Images
    2

    Septic system water filter

    I am starting to design a darkroom in a spare bedroom. The home has a septic system. I was looking to design a chemical filtration system that would remove the chemicals from the water that is going to the septic system. I am going to print traditional silver prints along with alternative processed prints. Is there a system or components that you can buy that is already setup for this situation? Any advise or comments would sure be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    Steven

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,060
    I wouldn't see how any filter would work. Filters filter particulates. The chemistry is in solution. Besides, the standard developers and fixers are for the large part biodegradeable. And stop bath is about the same as vinegar. I have a septic tank too. I wouldn't worry, unless you're going into production or commercial.

  3. #3
    Rom
    Rom is offline
    Rom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lyon - France
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    132
    Images
    2
    Hi,

    If you really want to clean your water, there is still some very small reverse osmosis system. But pay attention that you will still have a concentrate of waste that you will have to do something with.
    All the best,
    Rom
    ___________________
    Blog | G+ | My DeviantArt

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,280
    Images
    2
    If I only have a small or occasional amount of used, non-fixer chemicals, I just flush them. If I'm working in the darkroom a lot or in the days I did color I collect used chemicals in 5 gallon buckets and take them to the local wastewater plant where they let me dump it in the untreated ponds free of charge. A small amount is not going to hurt your septic. The problem comes in determining when a small amount becomes a big amount. I like to err on the side of caution. If I'm producing gallons of used chemical waste per week, I take it to the plant. If its just a few liters, I flush. What you also want to watch is your water usage, because overuse will flush solids into your field and you'll be buying a new septic system. My wash water goes directly outside so I don't worry about that.

  5. #5
    selmslie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Fernandina Beach FL
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    33
    Images
    28
    Unless you plan to process an extremely high volume of film and prints, you should have no problem with your waste water and it will not affect on your septic tank. You just need to treat your system regularly with yeast packets to keep the tank working, which you should do anyhow. Most photographic chemicals tend to neutralize each other and there is not enough silver or other byproducts to cause any problem with ordinary home use.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    69
    Get a copy of Kodak publication J-300, "Environmental Guidelines for Amateur Photographers". You will find the answers that you are looking for.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by jk0592 View Post
    Get a copy of Kodak publication J-300, "Environmental Guidelines for Amateur Photographers". You will find the answers that you are looking for.
    Wow! What quick responses to my post this morning. Thank you all so much for your input. I just joined this forum this morning and I can already see that there are some great people here. I just noticed that members can post some of their images. I will try and get a few uploaded soon. It is always great to see what people are shooting. Thanks again.

  8. #8
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,165
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by jk0592 View Post
    Get a copy of Kodak publication J-300, "Environmental Guidelines for Amateur Photographers".
    For convenience, here's the link...

    Environmental Guidelines for Amateur Photographers
    Publication #J-300, Eastman Kodak Company, 1999

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  9. #9
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,187
    Images
    343
    I had the same problem and so built the drain from the darkroom to a soakaway. You don't want to put chemicals into your septic tank.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #10
    Maris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    722
    I've had the luck to enjoy a career in scientific research and analytical chemistry before taking up photography full time. One of my challenges was teaching chemists at the local water supply and sewerage department about photographic chemicals in the effluent they had to treat. The "no fixer down the drain" anxiety comes up about a hundred times a year and has been doing so for at least half a century.

    The following does not apply to industrial scale photo materials manufacturing or a major processing lab, only households connected to a sewer line or a proper septic system:

    Developers are mild reducing agents that oxidise rapidly to inert components. The BOD (Biological Oxygen Demand) challenge offered by a home darkroom is much smaller than the BOD from a dishwasher, in-sink garbage disposal unit, or a toilet.

    Stop bath is a very mild acid that has no measurable effects on highly buffered systems like septic tanks or sewerage treatment plants.

    In moderate quantities (ounces, not tons) silver tetrathionate and similar compounds which characterise used fixer don't harm sewerage treatment systems or septic systems. The silver very quickly gets converted to silver sulphide in the presence of the free sulphide ion (smells like rotten eggs!). Silver sulphide is geologically stable and biologically inert and has one of the lowest solubility products known in chemistry. The stability and inertness of silver sulphide is the key to the remarkable archival properties of sepia toned photographs.

    Do your own calculations. Just estimate your yearly use of silver from your photographic materials consumption, allow 1 milligram per square inch, and divide this by your yearly water consumption from the water meter. I bet it's in the parts per billion range where no conceivable biological effect can be credibly imagined.

    In my professional career I have inspected home septic systems that have been "ruined" by people doing photographic processing. In every case it has been the fault of extravagant archival washing at the end of the processing sequence. Sending maybe two or three hundred extra litres of water a day into a system for days on end dilutes the activated sludge and slows the biological reactions that process and neutralise the usual septic stream. The extra water can also overwhelm the soakage pit or trench that lies at the end of the septic system and deliver a squelchy smelly mess.

    The world being what it is many local effluent standards are written by lawyers and/or accountants who don't know a dot of chemistry but know about culpability and lawsuits. Even Kodak publication J-300 which is the de facto last word on "fixer down the drain" is more about avoiding potential disputes and less about the niceties of chemistry. If you choose check with local authorities, ask their permission for what you intend to do, and they say no, I guess you have to comply.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin