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  1. #11
    Simon Howers's Avatar
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    Hmmm. My experience of digital negs is that they lack the density of film. Stacking them would give more density without having to fiddle about with the solutions. Registration would be a nightmare though !

  2. #12
    Simon Howers's Avatar
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    Neg Process

    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Howers View Post
    Hmmm. My experience of digital negs is that they lack the density of film. Stacking them would give more density without having to fiddle about with the solutions. Registration would be a nightmare though !
    Having looked at both videos - it would seem that the photographer is using a colour digital back on his MF camera. The lab are splitting the file into RGB to play with. The finished (reassembled) file is going to another lab who are using a (very expensive) machine to make internegs. This is a heavy-duty commercial operation.

    In this case, the photographer only takes the picture - everything else is done for him.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Howers View Post
    In this case, the photographer only takes the picture - everything else is done for him.
    I'm not at all sure what that is meant to imply - should I infer that thereby his photographs are somehow less "authentic" than someone who makes their own materials?

    But huge numbers of photographers don't make their own materials - they buy film made in a factory, shoot it in a camera made in factory, then send it off to laboratories who develop and print it for them. So for those photographers - and this will include some of the people often referred to as "the greats" - they only take the pictures, and everything else is done for them.

    I'm not sniping, by the way, I am simply genuinely puzzled by your remark.

  4. #14

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    I think that Simon was referring to the imagesetters used to make the negs. They are not amateur level gear (especially price-wise) but have been used for decades in large printing shops, so the experience in using them is in the same sort of business. The input to the imagesetter is typically Postscript driven, so all the usual manipulations you could imagine, and more, may have been used to end up with the perfect neg for the final prints.

    I'm not sure of the precise relation of the RGB separations to the Pt-Pn print either, possibly the adjusted separations are then contact-printed to one master-neg for use on the print?

  5. #15

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    Perhaps sandwiching the negatives serves the purpose of hiding imagesetter grain in the medium tone and (especially) highlight areas; imagesetter negatives can give serious grain; back when I was using imagesetter negatives, I had to print emulsion side up, in order to hide the strange blotching effect caused by some areas - being in very good contact - showing dots (even at 3600dpi hardware resolution!) and other areas not. This causes tonal differences and makes the print look blotchy / defective. Maybe they're laying the negatives so that the negative for the dark tones is in direct contact with the paper and on top of it the negative for midtones and to the top the negative for the highlights? (If they aren't doing multiple printings that is...) Since the 2nd and 3rd negatives (from the paper surface) aren't in close contact with the paper, they won't show the screening pattern, and since the detail / sharpness comes from high contrast areas which is (mostly) provided by the dark tone negative in close contact with the paper, this practice won't diminish (much) the apparent sharpness of the image. All that for creamy tones, is my take... (Again, if they are actually stacking all the negatives together and not doing multiple printings...)

    Regards,
    Loris.

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