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  1. #1
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    FP-100C - Successes with retrieving COLOR negs.

    So I've been meaning to experiment with that whole bleaching the negative of the peel apart films to get a B&W negative to scan.

    I didn't have the gelatin bleach that everyone talks about but I had normal liquid clorox bleach, so I used that, I coated the back side to take off the black backing, and washed the negative, I decided to scrape off the edge where some of the paper was still suck, and scratched some of the emulsion, so I figured I would do it all around just to give it an interesting look, and then I noticed that it seemed like there were 2 layers, a thick purple, and a lighter purple layer, so I scratched the corner to see if the lighter purple had any image information on it, it doesn't appear to, so I didn't scratch further.

    The pink line across the image is just refraction from the ANR glass i had put on top to keep it flat, I don't have a 4x5 ANR glass piece yet unfortunately...

    Anyway I was told specifically that the image would come out as a B&W negative, and that color couldn't be made from these, but to me the image looked like it had color in it, so I scanned it in color and definitely there are colors... so I wanted to share.

    I did have to dial in the tones, but mostly because the ANR pink refraction caused the auto-color settings to go haywire... cut I didn't add color, simply took it to the beat white balance I could given the film itself is pretty dense with a very pink mask (the term mask could be wrong but I mean as in a base color layer that is all pink, like a Color Negative has an orange base color).

    Have a look.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    And a crop to show some of the colors...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Now a few points about this image, for one, this was dusk, it was a 15 SECOND exposure at f/16 with my toyo45a. I was GOING to shoot a sheet of Provia100f after this, so this was a test image, but decided the scene was lame, and also the sky had lost it's colors. (yes I know you can do even longer exposures to get the sky to be even more colorful but at the time I was going for a balance of the scene and sky, by the time the test was done and checked, the land was too dark, and a properly exposed sky would have only given a silhouette of the treeline).

    The point in telling you all that, is that, it's possible MORE color might pop on a scene that is more intense, this one was very bland, dim, even, non-contrasty light scene, which would have been fine for maybe Velvia50 to saturate the color over time, but not for the fuji stuff.

    Anyway when I have more time I'll try with a negative that's more colorful if I can find one.

    Just looking for thoughts etc. and wanted to share.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  2. #2

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    I've saved a bunch of these negatives. I peel off as much of the paper as I can around the edges before the negative dries. When I have a few saved up, I clean the back with bleach and then wash them to remove all of the goo around the edges. They don't print real well in the darkroom. It's difficult to get the colors correct and the contrast is low. I imagine that it might be easier to scan them.

  3. #3
    jcoldslabs's Avatar
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    Stone,

    As you've discovered, the FP-100C film does produce color negatives, but the color is usually a bit muted compared to the positive. Below are two shots that used the negative bleaching method.

    Personally, I would recommend the bleach gel. It is much easier to control and is less likely to get onto the emulsion side than the regular Clorox liquid which is the consistency of water and gets all over the place.








    Jonathan

  4. #4
    NedL's Avatar
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    I came here from your gallery post...

    Wow! Yes Stone, I thought they were supposed to be color negatives from FP-100C and B/W from the discontinued FP-100B. I've been saving mine too, but don't have a scanner. I hadn't heard that the colors are more muted, but I had heard that it is easier to pull out shadow details from the negative.

    Johnathan those are gorgeous.

  5. #5
    winger's Avatar
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    I've always gotten color from color ones, too. Great job getting it from the regular, not gel.
    (It isn't the emulsion I'd ruin, I can pretty much guarantee my clothes would look like I had time-traveled from the acid wash 80s.)

    I have a couple sitting around I need to do, but other projects keep getting in the way.

    Jonathan - those are fantastic.

  6. #6
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Jonathan those ARE fantastic, really beautiful!

    I wonder what my flower images will look like... excited!

    Ned, the B&W ones are FP3000B ... that's three thousand. And I'm told you couldn't do this method with those, not sure why yet but I'm going to try, however I suspect it's because the negative gets totally burnt out from trying to expose at such a high ASA...

    Bethe, I could have sworn you were the one who said that the color ones' negative was going to end up B&W ... but perhaps that was a misunderstanding and you were saying that you could only PRINT them in B&W because the color was too hard to print?

    Curious what the negatives that I over or under exposed would look like, this one was done at the proper exposure (relatively) and seemed to scan OK after some tweaking though, my scanner software always auto-does it and with anything that's abnormal (like the pink streak from light refraction off the ANR glass) it totally throws it off. This was fun!
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #7
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    OK that stupid pink line was driving me crazy, so I opened up phtoshop for the first time in ... oh God .... 8 months? and then had to figure out all over again how to do anything... and I got rid of the pink line.... poorly at that... hah! and now the blurriness bugs me, but at least the pink isn't there...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #8
    jcoldslabs's Avatar
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    Thanks all for the kind words.

    I learned the hard way that this process seems to work best when performed shortly after exposure. Last year I shot some FP-100C and somehow misplaced the negatives before I could bleach and rinse them. When I found them after a few months bleaching off the black backing was no problem, but the emulsion side was covered in white flaky dots that I could not remove either by rinsing or re-soaking the negatives. I assume this was the developing reagent goop that had dried up on the surface. Sadly, there was no rescuing these negs. (See example below.) Has this been true for anyone else, that waiting too long before rinsing results in emulsion damage?




    Jonathan

  9. #9
    analoguey's Avatar
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    I have saved up a few to get the negatives out later - I was just gonna use regular bleach that is used for washing - I presume that's not a good one anymore? Jonathan - that looks bad! Wondering if my negatives are toast too!

    Sent from my LT26i using Tapatalk

  10. #10

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    I did it before a while back. From what I remember I washed off the gloop immediately on the emulsion side, using cold water. I'd say all right leaving it to dry on the negative it'd be very difficult to clean it afterward.
    One thing I noticed was that the negative seems quite overexposed or washed out, I subsequently tried shooting at 200 and 400, underexposing the print to try and get a nice dense negative. Mixed results :-D

    Both of these are scanned...
    This was shot at 100
    Click image for larger version. 

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    This one at 400
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I taped them to a plate, emulsion side down, after removing the gloop, and then used Milton Fluid to clear off the black backing.

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