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  1. #1
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Does sodium tungsten change the sensitivity with Ziartypes?

    I've been experimenting with Ziatype. Without sodium tungsten, the prints are a bit cold for my taste. Adding it warms the print up. Does sodium tungsten change the speed or contrast of the prints. My preliminary test so far doesn't indicate that. What's your experience?
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  2. #2

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    IME it doesn't change much the speed but lowers contrast considerably. BTW, I don't feel the need of adding sodium tungstate anymore; when I need warm prints I just dry the coated paper longer... (Gives chocolate browns instead of yellowish/gold browns you get w/ sodium tungstate.)

    Regards,
    Loris.

  3. #3
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Thanks Loris. Came through for me again. Do you get a good Dmax with a dryer emulsion?
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  4. #4
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    Hmm, no Tn and let the paper dry longer. Sounds interesting. When you say longer, what does that mean to you?

  5. #5

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    Hi all, you get a slightly lower dmax by drying more. It depends much on how dry the paper was. Too dry and the print is too warm / dmax not satisfactory. But it's possible to find the correct amnt. of moisture giving nice chocolate brown prints with convincing dmax. My usual drying time with Ziatype is 10-15 minutes (at 22C, 50-60% RH), you'll get warm prints by drying the paper 20-30 (or slightly more) minutes in the same conditions. Depends much on your RH, a humidification chamber a la Dr. Ware is handy. (See H4 in "Salt hydration chambers" section @ http://www.mikeware.co.uk/mikeware/N...e_Process.html) Test...

    BTW, I'm not totally against sodium tungstate. It works nice with some kinds of prints - when you need a golden yellow tint...

    Regards,
    Loris.
    Last edited by Loris Medici; 05-13-2014 at 03:43 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added link to Dr. Ware's page...

  6. #6
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Thanks again

    Quote Originally Posted by Loris Medici View Post
    Hi all, you get a slightly lower dmax by drying more. It depends much on how dry the paper was. Too dry and the print is too warm / dmax not satisfactory. But it's possible to find the correct amnt. of moisture giving nice chocolate brown prints with convincing dmax. My usual drying time with Ziatype is 10-15 minutes (at 22C, 50-60% RH), you'll get warm prints by drying the paper 20-30 (or slightly more) minutes in the same conditions. Depends much on your RH, a humidification chamber a la Dr. Ware is handy. (See H4 in "Salt hydration chambers" section @ http://www.mikeware.co.uk/mikeware/N...e_Process.html) Test...

    BTW, I'm not totally against sodium tungstate. It works nice with some kinds of prints - when you need a golden yellow tint...

    Regards,
    Loris.
    You're saving me a lot of work. I did make some prints with sodium tungstate and I like the yellowish brown. I'll just have to experiment.

    Best,
    Don
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang



 

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