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  1. #1

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    Focusing with infrared

    OK: slightly freaking out. Think I might have messed up my roll of infrared. Won't be able to develop it until next Tuesday, so thought I would ask. Shot my first roll of infrared with a Nikon N65. I covered up that little square inside that you're supposed to cover up and loaded and unloaded in the dark.
    My question is: did I mess up the roll by: 1) manually focusing and not "back focusing" and/or 2) not covering up the little viewing line that shows you what roll of film you have loaded in the camera.
    Someone, calm my nerves, please. Compositionally, it turned out to be a great session. Hopefully all won't be lost.

    Thanks! Lisa

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    kaiyen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Checkergirl
    My question is: did I mess up the roll by: 1) manually focusing and not "back focusing"
    Depends on which filter you used. A red 25 lets enough visible light through that you don't need to make any focusing correction. with an opaque "IR" filter like a wratten 87 or a Hoya RG72, you do need to make some correction.

    I once read an interesting argument that folks incorrectly compensating for focus may in fact aid the common perception of the difficulty of IR focusing. They in fact make their images _less_ sharp by compensating too much, and then get even more worked up about how hard it is to focus (having trouble saying that - does that make sense).

    regardless, develop it and see what happens.
    2) not covering up the little viewing line that shows you what roll of film you have loaded in the camera.
    I have never covered up that little window on my n70 and I have not had a problem with a couple dozen rolls of HIE.

    allan

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Checkergirl
    OK: slightly freaking out. Think I might have messed up my roll of infrared. Won't be able to develop it until next Tuesday, so thought I would ask. Shot my first roll of infrared with a Nikon N65. I covered up that little square inside that you're supposed to cover up and loaded and unloaded in the dark.
    My question is: did I mess up the roll by: 1) manually focusing and not "back focusing" and/or 2) not covering up the little viewing line that shows you what roll of film you have loaded in the camera.
    Someone, calm my nerves, please. Compositionally, it turned out to be a great session. Hopefully all won't be lost.

    Thanks! Lisa
    No, you won't mess up by not making that minor focusing adjustment. And no, you probably will be okay for not covering up the viewing window. There's really no way to tell until you develop the film. Be sure to let us know how it came out and feel free to ask any questions you might have.
    Diane

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  4. #4
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    (Insert your favorite calm, soothing music here ) I wouldn't worry too much about the focus compensation, Lisa. Unless you were shooting at fairly wide apertures, and fairly close, it shouldn't be much of an issue. Some IRophiles shoot at f8 or smaller, just to avoid the issue altogether.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

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    Ahhhh.....thanks, everyone. Yes, I am definitely going to develop it next week, and will keep my fingers crossed. I used a 25 red filter, so it seems that all might be ok. But, I was using a large aperture (I wasn't using a tripod, so I using pretty open settings). We'll see . . . thanks for the nerve calming!
    Lisa

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    I shot this sunflower at, I think, f4 with a red 25. You should be fine.

    allan

  7. #7
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    Your biggest concern based on my one roll of experience and from what I've read is exposure. From what I understand the film "sees" light differently than that of a meter. Also I've heard many different opinions as to what ISO to use. You didn't mention if you bracketed your exposures. Sorry to give you something else to worry about. Maybe someone else can make you feel more comfortable.
    "When elephants fight it is the grass that suffers"
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    IRAQNAM is Bush's legacy

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    Yes, I thought about the bracketing issue, too. I believe my camera meters at 100 ISO if it can't "read" what's in the camera. And, no, I didn't bracket . . . the truth will be in the developin'!

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    Wow . . . very cool pic. Thanks! Will let everyone know how the roll comes out. And, if any of them are worthy, I'll be sure to post 'em!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Checkergirl
    Yes, I thought about the bracketing issue, too. I believe my camera meters at 100 ISO if it can't "read" what's in the camera. And, no, I didn't bracket . . . the truth will be in the developin'!
    I had forgotten that the N65 defaults to 100 with nonDX film.

    You will actually probably end up with underexposed film, which is maybe not terrible (I tend to blow the heck out of HIE more often than not, especially the first several rolls I shot. I was saved only through bracketing). If you're camera was defaulting to 100, then with metering through the red 25 you're effectively down to 12.

    Usually, the "starting point" is to set your meter to 400, then meter through a red 25 to get to an effective 50 (red 25 == 3 stop loss, which takes you from 400 to 50). Many people will actually set the meter to 50 and meter without the filter on to help with composition, etc. I hope that makes sense.

    so...what you can do next time is to meter without the filter with a +1 exposure compensation (or just do it manually by 1 stop over). This will give you an exposure that is equivalent to if it were 50 speed film. Or, you can do it through the filter with a -2 compensation - its' the same thing (taking you from 12 to 50).

    Again, I hope that makes sense. I can try again if it doesn't :-)

    allan

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