Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,557   Posts: 1,545,228   Online: 868
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    Kerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,466
    Images
    238
    Quote Originally Posted by Digidurst
    Kerik, I really enjoyed perusing your website - beautiful imagery there! Noticed a few prints that were done on vellum. I had no idea such a material would work but it has inspired me to try the medium.
    Ellen,

    Thank you. If you want to try vellum for pt/pd, I'd suggest Clearprint 100% Rag drafting vellum. Be aware though, that the vellum papers I've tried have been prone to producing black spots - probably from ferric contaminants in the paper.

    Jane - Again, I've not used the Rockland product, but I doubt you will get a true white from it. If you look at period tintypes in antique stores, they tend to have a muted, grayish look to them. Which is the character of the process.

    Ole - regarding the ferrous sulfate developer. I hadn't read about storing it in clear bottles as you suggest. I only make up enough at a time that I will use for a session, so I haven't really stored it for any length of time. And as for bluish tones, was that in reference to collodion images or is this developer also used for other purposes?

    Kerik
    www.kerik.com

  2. #22
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    I have never tried this developer myself, but it is mentioned in all my old German books as a good plate developer - mostly "normal" silver gelatine plates and "lantern plates", where it is said to give "very good images with a beautiful blue tone". I'm currently at work in the North Sea, so I can't check my library for quite a while. But I found the information interesting, and that means I can usually remember it correctly

    Just for reference - the relevant books are Eder's tables, and Dr. E. Vogel's 1910 book I've quoted here before.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #23
    Digidurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    SC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    629
    Images
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    No, not at all. The developer works by oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) by reduction of Ag(I) to Ag(0). Just the same as what happens in Kallitype; except there you start with Fe(III) and Ag(I), and some of the iron is reduced to Fe(II) by the light. Here you have a solution of Fe(II), some of which will slowly be oxidised to Fe(III) over time. So keeping it in bright light will reduce it to Fe(II) again!
    Well, who da thunk it?!?

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    246
    Being up here in Manitoba, Canada, there's not much chance of learning tintype from a practitioner of the art. Large Format even by conventional means is pretty rare here. If there's any alternative photography going on, I have never heard about it.
    While it may not be a hotbed of alt photography there are a few of us doing some interesting things in Manitoba. My specialty is Platinum/Palladium, Cyantoypes and Kallitypes. I give workshops a couple times a year on alt and large format photography at the PrairieView school of photography. In fact I will be helping a young lady try to figure out the tintype process this weekend.

    There are others that do some fine alt work including a terrific photographer named Bruce Monk who does some very nice dance photography in Pt/Pd.

    Calamity, why don't you drop me a line sometime at the school ( I own it) I would be more than happy to offer you what ever advice I can.

    Cheers!

    CraigK

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Leesburg, VA
    Posts
    21
    Thanks for sharing this Andy.

    Well worth a look, Everybody... very interesting.
    Jim

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Floriduh
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,271
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Calamity Jane
    Just getting my fingers wet in tintype, with the Rocklands AG-Plus and "tintype developer" and hoping someone here can asnwer some questions.

    #1 - The developer mixed up the colour of strong tea. It was purchased directly from Rockland only recently but I had read that the brown colour indicates it is "oxidized". The process isn't working well for me, so could this be part of the problem?

    #2 - Coating thickness. When I spread the AG-Plus with my finger into a nice thin sheet, it all seems to just "wash off" in the developer and leave no image. When I paint it on thick with a brush, I get a better image but it is still REALLY dark (even when exposed up to f5.6 @ 3 seconds - books says f16@.5S in sunlight) Could this also be the developer? How thick should the emulsion coating be? As thick as a sheet of paper? As thick as a sheet of photo paper?

    I have the opportunity to market "olde tyme photos" to 10,000 to 15,000 people over 4 days in July but I am rapidly loosing faith in the reliability of the tintype process!
    Did you ever get this process down? I know the thread is a little old....wayne

  7. #27
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    Just in case Jane doesn't see this -- over on the Large Format Forum she posted that replacement developer from Rockland solved the problem and she was getting much nicer plates now.

  8. #28
    Calamity Jane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    159
    Images
    1
    Yup, I got the Tintypes 90% the way I want them and very consistent. I'm quite happy with the whole thing.

    My biggest problem was a bad batch of developer, which Rockland replaced. Once the developer was working, I was able to concentrate on the other aspect of the process.

    I have come to learn that Tintypes are 80% craftsmanship (handling the plates), 10% photography, and 10% blind luck

    You'll be hearing from me Craig!

  9. #29
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    Well, Jane, after seeing your pages chronicling construction of your 4x5 cameras, I'd have to say your craftsmanship is fine; your photography appears well in hand as well, so now you just have to contend with the "blind luck" factor -- and 90% odds aren't a bad bet, IMO.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin