Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,206   Posts: 1,531,796   Online: 890
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: Carbon prints

  1. #21
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,649
    Images
    14
    This is exciting as I think I can control the negative stage quite easily with the Lambda unit and film.(though time will tell)
    I will be using continuous tone film and If you have any suggestions on reading material that would help me in refreshing myself in tri colour printing it would be greatly appreciated.
    Regarding buying old technology and making images the way you suggest, I think the idea is a good one and I wish you all the success in making true period prints. A good print is a good print no matter what process you use.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie
    This is exciting as I think I can control the negative stage quite easily with the Lambda unit and film.(though time will tell)
    I will be using continuous tone film and If you have any suggestions on reading material that would help me in refreshing myself in tri colour printing it would be greatly appreciated.
    Have a look at Colour Photograhy in Practice by D. A. Spencer. I particulary recommend the 3rd edition by Pitman Publishing Corporation, published in New York and London in 1948. Earlier and later editions of CPP are useful but this one is the best IMO.

    Bear in mind that much of the older literature focuses on three-color carbro rather than three-color carbon. For various reasons, the most important being that there is a finite point to development with carbro and not carbon, it was long considered that more consistent and repeatable results were possible with carbro printing.

    Sandy

  3. #23
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,649
    Images
    14
    Thanks Sandy, I will get the book

  4. #24

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    236
    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    Bear in mind that there is really no single carbon look since carbn prints can be of any color, be found on glossy, matte surface and water color papers, (or even glass or metal), have considerable relief or none at all, and have very high or very low Dmax. You can also see considerable variation in the look of silver gelatin prints as well (matte to luster to glossy surfaces, for example, and different colors from toning), but the range of possibilities is not nearly so great as with carbon.

    With regard to the Bostick and Sullivan tissue, it is designed more for printing speed than to give high relief. Dick Sullivan looked at a lot of vintage carbon prints and found that a high percentage of them did not show much relief so he decided that look was not very important for him. And for that matter, most of my own carbon work has been with tissues that produce relatively low relief. However, there is no question but that the ability to give high relief is one of the most distinctive characteristics of the carbon process, and one that can not be found in any other photographic printing process.

    Sandy
    Sandy, thanks for commenting on the B&S tissue. I noticed that using 1% and even 0.5% potassium dichromate increased contrast to match my negatives that are developed in Pyrocat HD and print well on AZO gr3. Still I felt I was missing D max. Maybe my negs are too soft for carbon, or maybe B&S's tissue is of low Dmax for the reason that you have mentioned. Tissue was sensitized in water.

    I remember being fascinated looking at the print at an angle while it was still somewhat wet. The relief was amazing but it was all gone once it got totaly dry.

    How thick a relief do you think you can get with your formula?

    Also, are you happy with the results you are getting with digital negatives for the Carbon process??

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by colivet
    Sandy, thanks for commenting on the B&S tissue. I noticed that using 1% and even 0.5% potassium dichromate increased contrast to match my negatives that are developed in Pyrocat HD and print well on AZO gr3. Still I felt I was missing D max. Maybe my negs are too soft for carbon, or maybe B&S's tissue is of low Dmax for the reason that you have mentioned. Tissue was sensitized in water.

    I remember being fascinated looking at the print at an angle while it was still somewhat wet. The relief was amazing but it was all gone once it got totaly dry.

    How thick a relief do you think you can get with your formula?

    Also, are you happy with the results you are getting with digital negatives for the Carbon process??
    I was able to get really good Dmax with the B&S tissue. From what you say, i.e. that your negatives printed well on AZO #3, I think you are right in that your negatives appear to be a little soft for carbon.

    The kind of relief you see when the B&S tissue is wet is a hint of what I am trying to get with the dry image. The actual height of the raised shadows is not really all that great, maybe 2-3/1000 of an inch, but that height gives a very real dimensional effect.

    And yes, I am very happy with the results from digital negatives. Print quality is for all practical purposes as good as with in-camera negatives, and the digital negatives are much easier to print since I do all of the tonal corrections on the file before printing the negative.

    Sandy

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin