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Thread: Carbon prints

  1. #1

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    Jay,

    Can you provide a contact for more info on sandys workshop?
    Mike

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdef
    I just received two of the most beautiful prints that I've ever seen. They're both carbon prints, and they were both made by Sandy King. Reading descriptions of carbon prints, and the relief images did not prepare me for the impact of the real thing. My anxieties concerning the technical demands of carbon printing instantly evaporated as I looked at these incredible images. I've seen well made platinum prints, and Azo prints, but neither compares to the unique and fascinating beauty of these carbon prints. In short; I'm all in. I will do whatever is required of me to work in this process, and I'll start by attending Sandy's workshop in June. I have some framing to do, but I weanted to thank Sandy, and to encourage anyone remotely interested in the Carbon printing process to seriously consider attending Sandy's workshop; he clearly knows what he's doing, and I want to know too.

    Jay
    Jay, that sounds awesome. I have made some prints with The Bostick and Sullivan's tissue and enjoyed the process but did not get hooked. I obviously do not know what I am doing and have never seen a real Carbon print, but I definetly would love to go through the same experience that you had. I have a feeling that carbon has a great potential but the learning curve is quite brutal.
    Your comments sparked my interest. I will contact Sandy for further information.

    Thanks!

  3. #3
    roy
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdef
    I just received two of the most beautiful prints that I've ever seen. They're both carbon prints, and they were both made by Sandy King. Jay
    I have never seen a carbon print "in the flesh". I have seen optical references to the process on a video made to demonstrate the bromoil process. Even then I was struck by the detail and the overall appearance but thought that technique was required beyond my abilities at that time. I hope you can take your current enthusiasm further.
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

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    Hi,

    I also received Sandy's prints. One 8x10 and one smaller print. They seem to be from the same location. I just had some questions about them. I guess these are more to Sandy than anyone else.

    I am curious to know whether these are printed from digital negatives or not.
    If so, I cannot figure out why one looks too contrasty and the other looks just about right. I am just curious to know how many factors involved in adjusting contrast in carbon printing.

    Also, are they printed on regular fiber-base matte paper? Or what kind of paper are they?

    Now, I am really trying to figure out some logistics to go to Montana this summer. I just posted another message, but if anyone would not mind sharing a room with me at the workshop, let me know.

    Warmly,
    Tsuyoshi

  5. #5
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    There are several processes that fall within the term "carbon prints", and I'm not sure which of those processes Sandy is going to cover in his workshop. There is, however, a fellow (whose name escapes me at the moment) here in the SF Bay area who does what I would call color carbon-pigment transfer prints. That process involves first doing color-separation negatives, and then printing those onto the transfer media. The color-separated images on the processed transfer media are then transferred to the final paper substrata, similar to the dye-transfer process.

    While very expensive to produce (he said his typical expense to produce a 16x20 or 20x24 print was $700-$1,000, excluding time involved), the prints were absolutely stunning. They were like looking at 16x20 transparencies.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  6. #6
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    I just received a sample from Sandy as well. The relief in the image is amazing. The shadows rise above the paper.

  7. #7
    roy
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    While very expensive to produce (he said his typical expense to produce a 16x20 or 20x24 print was $700-$1,000,
    Can you confirm those figures ?
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinnya
    Hi,

    I also received Sandy's prints. One 8x10 and one smaller print. They seem to be from the same location. I just had some questions about them. I guess these are more to Sandy than anyone else.

    I am curious to know whether these are printed from digital negatives or not.
    If so, I cannot figure out why one looks too contrasty and the other looks just about right. I am just curious to know how many factors involved in adjusting contrast in carbon printing.

    Also, are they printed on regular fiber-base matte paper? Or what kind of paper are they?

    Now, I am really trying to figure out some logistics to go to Montana this summer. I just posted another message, but if anyone would not mind sharing a room with me at the workshop, let me know.

    Warmly,
    Tsuyoshi
    Hi Tsuyoshi,

    I took a short trip to Florida and this is my first chance to answer mail.

    My presumption is that the print you refer to as having too much contrast is the small one? If so, my purpose in sending the small, contrasty print was to demonstrate the amount of relief you can get with a medium to very high relief tissue.

    The prints were indeed made from a digital negative, but the negative was calibrated for one of the tissues and not the other. You can probably tell (by the color) that two different carbon tissues were used for the two prints.

    The things that determing contrast in carbon are:

    1. The negative.

    2. The tissue. More pigment gives more contrast and vice-versa.

    3. The sensitizer. Weaker percent solutions give higher contrast images than strong solutions.

    All three factors must be evaluated together in determining printing time and how contrast will be controlled.

    Sandy

  9. #9
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Sandy King

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rbarker

    While very expensive to produce (he said his typical expense to produce a 16x20 or 20x24 print was $700-$1,000,


    IS THIS TRUE???

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    There are several processes that fall within the term "carbon prints", and I'm not sure which of those processes Sandy is going to cover in his workshop. There is, however, a fellow (whose name escapes me at the moment) here in the SF Bay area who does what I would call color carbon-pigment transfer prints. That process involves first doing color-separation negatives, and then printing those onto the transfer media. The color-separated images on the processed transfer media are then transferred to the final paper substrata, similar to the dye-transfer process.

    While very expensive to produce (he said his typical expense to produce a 16x20 or 20x24 print was $700-$1,000, excluding time involved), the prints were absolutely stunning. They were like looking at 16x20 transparencies.
    I will be teaching what is known as *monochrome* carbon transfer printing. This method involves, 1) sensitizing a sheet of carbon tissue, 2) when dry, contact printing the light sensitive carbon tissue using a UV light source, 3) wet the tissue and mate it with a final support paper and leave in contact under weight for 15-30 minutes, and 4) developing the print in warm water, during which you strip the tissue away leaving the image on the final support.

    Carbon transfer dates from the middle of the 19th century. It is very different from direct carbon processes such as Fresson and gum bichromate. I also have done in the past three-color carbon and carbro printing but the complexities of color carbon and carbro are well beyond the scope of a five day workshop when most people will be starting from scratch.

    A few color carbon printing services have been availble in the US in the recent past, but at this time I am only familiar with one or two persons with the skills required to work the process. It is very labor intensive and requires a tremendous amount of skill and familiarity with the characteristics of the materials, and these days there is no source of color carbon tissue so one must make it.

    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 03-21-2005 at 07:18 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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