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  1. #1
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    oilprint - anyone?

    my girlfriend and I just started trying the oilprint process...

    for some reason it seems that my twin brother might be the only on in the world that does this now...:-)
    that can't be true..

    anyone in here?

    mind you: I am talking about the original oilprinting - not the bromoil which everybody seems to be doing...

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi
    my girlfriend and I just started trying the oilprint process...

    for some reason it seems that my twin brother might be the only on in the world that does this now...:-)
    that can't be true..

    anyone in here?

    mind you: I am talking about the original oilprinting - not the bromoil which everybody seems to be doing...
    I believe David Spencer does it as well, as least this is what I was told about his prints when I went to look at them. How do you do this oil prints? The ones I saw from Spencer were beautiful!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi
    my girlfriend and I just started trying the oilprint process...

    for some reason it seems that my twin brother might be the only on in the world that does this now...:-)
    that can't be true..

    anyone in here?

    mind you: I am talking about the original oilprinting - not the bromoil which everybody seems to be doing...
    Are you talking about Rawling's oils??
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  4. #4
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garryl
    Are you talking about Rawling's oils??
    now - I have NO idea who Rawling is - or his oils for that matter....

    the way to do it in a few words:

    take some fine graphic paper. apply 3-5 layers of gelatine on it - avoid bubbles and brush strokes...
    when dry, apply a 3% potassium chromate on the paper - "work it in"...

    then - when dry - place a LF negative on the paper - expose in sun light and put the paper in cold water and wash.
    dry the paper - and then let it soak in max 20degrees C water for about 20 min.

    then apply and remove oil paint (made stiff) until the "master piece" hopefully will appear.. (this part is the one that can take 25 years to learn.....)

    dry and drink some whisky! - you've earned it..

    I'll attach an oilprint I did some years ago...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails oil-kopi.jpg  

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    Ah well, then this is significantly different from what I saw. First off I made a mistake, the name is Jack Spencer, if you want to check some great photography, then take a gander here.

    http://www.andrewsmithgallery.com/ex...ncer/index.htm

    You have to see these things in person to appreciate them.

  6. #6

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    Where does the name oil print come from ? It seems you are sensitizing gelatin (plus something else) with potassium chromate and making the U.V. exposed areas (through the negative) insoluble in water, while washing the unexposed parts out. I assume you do a color separation and apply 4 coats ?
    I´ve worked with silk-screen emulsions (PVA based) which work in a similar manner. Did I understand you correctly ?
    Photos are made four inches behind the camera

  7. #7
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    thanks for the link - not oil printing by far, but beautiful nevertheless...

    here is a link to one of the all time masters - unfortunately, he took all his secrets with him when he died...

    http://photophilia.net/pictorial/andreev/index.html

  8. #8
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    Bromoil evolved from the oil-printing process developed by G.E.H. Rawlings in 1904, which is a pigment-based process using paper with a dichromated gelatin matrix requiring a negative the same size as the desired print size. In 1907, responding to the problems of using contact-sized negatives, E.J. Wall wrote a brief article suggesting the use of a bromide enlargement as the basis for the oil print.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Rockstroh
    Where does the name oil print come from ? It seems you are sensitizing gelatin (plus something else) with potassium chromate and making the U.V. exposed areas (through the negative) insoluble in water, while washing the unexposed parts out. I assume you do a color separation and apply 4 coats ?
    I´ve worked with silk-screen emulsions (PVA based) which work in a similar manner. Did I understand you correctly ?
    not quite.
    sentizising only using the potassium dichromate.
    no colour separation - B/W neg and the colour(s) is mixed before applying...

  10. #10
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garryl
    Bromoil evolved from the oil-printing process developed by G.E.H. Rawlings in 1904, which is a pigment-based process using paper with a dichromated gelatin matrix requiring a negative the same size as the desired print size. In 1907, responding to the problems of using contact-sized negatives, E.J. Wall wrote a brief article suggesting the use of a bromide enlargement as the basis for the oil print.
    Garry

    thanks for that!
    in that case, it is the first mentioned....

    I have knowlegde of so many doing the bromoil, but for some (strange) reason it seems that oil print is not so interesting..
    I wonder why, as in many ways te oil printing is easier than the brom oil.
    and a lot of people have LF cameras..
    (and you can use digitally made transparents using PS also..)

    "new" ground to try?

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