Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,816   Posts: 1,581,630   Online: 768
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Quote Originally Posted by photomc
    Well, that makes sense and I knew we had albumen prints that have lasted a long time. Wonder if egg albumen is any better than say bovine or pork. I know they are made from different components...will have to give it try. Maybe find some of the powered albumen they sell at some of the scientific web sites, if they sell it in small enough quantities.
    Some people in the B&S forum mentioned the powdered egg whites were great since the denaturation time was less than doing the egg white separation from eggs and stirring to brak up the long chain molecules. As I said I am working on an albumen batch right now, if it works fine maybe you and I can buy the dried albumen in a bigger batch, give me another 5 days and I will let you know what kind of results it gives.

  2. #22
    roy
    roy is offline
    roy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Sussex
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    Some people in the B&S forum mentioned the powdered egg whites were great since the denaturation time was less than doing the egg white separation from eggs
    I made an albumen print during a workshop with Terry King and I do not recall keeping the egg white for as long as a week. Is it necessary to let it mature for that length of time ?
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Quote Originally Posted by roy
    I made an albumen print during a workshop with Terry King and I do not recall keeping the egg white for as long as a week. Is it necessary to let it mature for that length of time ?
    To tell you the truth I dont know. Terry posted that one should prepare the albumen as one should for albumen printing and most of the books I have read on it mention at least a week but I dont know for sure that this is absolutely necessary. It might not be.

  4. #24
    cjarvis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    183
    Images
    26
    I've printed with albumen that's been in my fridge for over a year. Of course I've also used it the day after I made it. Denaturing egg whites with acetic acid is fast...a week is plenty of time.

    And if it's preserved with sodium citrate, it should keep well with little mold formation even after several months. Any mold that does form may be easily strained off. When I make albumen I use a combination of sodium or potassium chloride (I prefer the latter) and sodium citrate just for preservation.

  5. #25
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,521
    Images
    65
    The reason that using fixed out paper works is due to the fact that the baryta layer acts as a barrier, and that there is a gelatin overcoat (size) on it.

    You may want to consider using just a plain gelatin size rather than going to the trouble of using albumen, unless it imparts a special 'look' or 'feel' to your work.

    PE

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    The reason that using fixed out paper works is due to the fact that the baryta layer acts as a barrier, and that there is a gelatin overcoat (size) on it.

    You may want to consider using just a plain gelatin size rather than going to the trouble of using albumen, unless it imparts a special 'look' or 'feel' to your work.

    PE
    To what is the baryta layer a barrier? One can make Pt./Pd. prints on drawing papers with no gelatin or albumin sizing, or on the same papers with sizing with both of these colloids. What does the baryta barrier have to do with anything other than providing a suface that is perhaps whiter to the eye?

    Sandy

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    To what is the baryta layer a barrier? One can make Pt./Pd. prints on drawing papers with no gelatin or albumin sizing, or on the same papers with sizing with both of these colloids. What does the baryta barrier have to do with anything other than providing a suface that is perhaps whiter to the eye?

    Sandy
    I thought that was the whole purpose of the baryta layer, as whitener so that the prints do not have the color of the paper.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    I thought that was the whole purpose of the baryta layer, as whitener so that the prints do not have the color of the paper.
    I accept the use of the baryta layer as a whitener, but my understanding of the sizing, be it gelatin or albumin, is that ite primary purpose is to keep the sensitizer on the surface and prevent it from seeping into the fibers of the paper.

    Sandy

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    I accept the use of the baryta layer as a whitener, but my understanding of the sizing, be it gelatin or albumin, is that ite primary purpose is to keep the sensitizer on the surface and prevent it from seeping into the fibers of the paper.

    Sandy
    Yeah, I was referring to PE's post. I too would like to know what is the baryta layer a barrier to.

  10. #30
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by photomc
    Also, seems like I recall reading somewhere that COT320 is used to make some Bergger silver papers, just don't recall what or where I read it......may not be true.
    It's true, and it's the "Bergger Art Classic Silver Supreme" paper. It's a wonderful paper, but probably the most expensive silver gelatin paper on the market. I used the last of mine for "the black print" I sent out in one of the print exchanges. When it works with the image, it's the best there is. When it doesn't - well, there are lots of "conventional" papers!

    BTW, this paper is also the only one I know of not to have a baryta layer. So the emulsion is soaked into the fibers, which may be one reason for the price...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin