Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,884   Posts: 1,520,552   Online: 936
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33

Thread: Albumen Prints

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    23

    Albumen Prints

    A couple of year's back, our local art museum had several rooms dedicated to photographic history. They had several Pt. / Pd. prints along with other alternative process prints. Some of these prints were on loan from private collections and were the cream of the crop!
    Now the Pt. / Pd. prints were very nice indeed! One could see the extensive amount of time and labor that went into making the prints. I have never been exposed to that specific process. Only from what I've read, have I determined that it is time consuming, expensive, and giving to somewhat of a high rate of hit and miss results. I may be wrong in my thinking in regards to this process, so please forgive my ignorance.
    Never the less, the prints that immediately became the love of my photographic life that day, were none other than the Albumen prints. The clarity, tones and warmth were stunning! I always felt that if I were ever to take a workshop in alternative process printing, it would be the Albumen process!
    Does anyone out there do Albumen printing? Can you tell me something about the process, cost and rate of repeatability as compared to the other processes? Are the tonality and warmth of the prints a trademark of this process. Do you need the bulletproof looking negative in order to print with this process?
    I'd love to do a workshop in this medium! Thanks for your time to my questions.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    White Lake, Ontario.
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    342
    Before starting, Rick, let me say that I've not made albumen prints myself but have read a good fair bit about it in anticipation of trying it out (soon, I hope). So don't take my "advice" as gospel.

    To give you a little more insight into this process, check out these good intro videos. http://albumen.stanford.edu/video/munsonhome.html as well as the main page at http://albumen.stanford.edu/

    Albumen prints are cheaper to make than platinum prints but you will still need some rather expensive chemicals like gold chloride to tone the prints and silver nitrate to sensitize them. You do need "bullet proof" negs, just like with most alt processes as regular negs just won't cut it. Know too that albumen prints will not last anywhere near what platinum prints will. Being made from egg white, they will yellow and become spotty in fairly short order.

    The old albumen prints that you saw have a look all their own that may be hard to duplicate. They were likely taken with wet collodion among other things, so don't be surprised if you're disappointed by totally different feel to your prints. That's where toning plays a critical part - the look and feel of the print depends on your toning to a great extent. Many toners can be used (i.e selenium) but gold is usually the standard with albumen.

    As for a workshop, one is scheduled at the APUG conference next May. You may want to look into that.

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,154
    Images
    20
    Are you in the New York area? I also like the look of albumen prints and am interested in learning the process. Dave Wooten and I are going to be taking an albumen workshop the weekend of October 8. I believe there are still openings for the workshop, if you're in the neighborhood. Info at http://cfaahp.org/.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #4
    Kerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,465
    Images
    238
    First, if albumen has stolen your heart, you should go for it. But, let me say that the reputation for the exessive cost and difficulty of pt/pd printing is overstated. It is an easy, repeatable process and is quite economical, especially if you place any monetary value on your time.

    But, to answer your question, here are links to two organizations that offer albumen printing workshops:

    The Photographer's Formulary
    Center for Alternative and Historic Processes

    There are probably other opportunities out there as well.

    Good luck!
    Kerik Kouklis
    www.kerik.com

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    23
    Sorry David, I'm in Rockford Michigan.

  6. #6
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,280
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Grenier
    ... Know too that albumen prints will not last anywhere near what platinum prints will. Being made from egg white, they will yellow and become spotty in fairly short order....
    So I can expect that my little collection of albumen prints (1864 - 1895) will start falling apart soon, then?

    I'm planning to try this some day soon, I have everything needed. Including negatives that print well on POP, which is similar only less eggy.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  7. #7
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Vegas/mysterious mohave co. az, Big Pine Key Fla.
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,713
    Images
    20
    and remember Ole, those old prints in your collection were all made with eggs laid by happy range free chickens, unlike the unfortunate fowl of today.

  8. #8
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,280
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    But I only use free-range eggs when I can't get ecological - and the neighbor is out of fresh eggs from his (very) free-ranging pet flock?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #9
    garysamson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    217
    Images
    26
    Rick, The albumen print process is not difficult to master. I teach albumen printing to my BFA photo students as part of a handmade photography course and several of my students have gone on to a semester of independent study concentrating exclusively on albumen printing and three of my students prepared a working manual as part of their corse work.
    If you process your film in a developer such as Pyrocat HD, your negatives do not have to be bullet-proof to produce images with a full range of tones. As for their longevity, last week I brought my students over to the local art museum to look at some albumen prints by Carleton Watkins made in the 1860's. Except for a little yellowing, the prints were in perfect condition and I suspect that they will look that way for another 150 years. If you contact me offline I would be happy to provide more detailed information about the process, materials, equipment etc.

  10. #10
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,154
    Images
    20
    Dave and I just finished the albumen workshop today, and we learned a lot and got some great results. Daniel Levin, the instructor, prints albumen for John Dugdale and others, and though he's a young guy, he's a fine printer. His approach is more intuitive and based on experience of what works than it is scientific (he doesn't use a densitometer or print step tablets), but that kind of approach works well in a workshop setting. In a book or over the internet, it makes more sense to talk about density values, because there is no other way to communicate that information effectively, but there's no substitute for working with someone who's "got the eye" and can talk about what negatives will work and when it's ready to pull it from the printing frame, based on how it looks, and who can demonstrate the mechanics of floating the paper in the albumen and then the sensitizer.

    I brought five negatives of different density ranges to the workshop, ranging from two negs targeted for Azo around grade 2 to one that took 5-1/2 hours to expose in the UV exposure unit. The best ones (one TMX in D-76 1+1, one TXT in ABC pyro) were negs that printed a little too contrasty in Azo grade 2 with a water bath.

    Albumen was the first process that could produce a relatively glossy, sharp print, though you can dial that back by printing on a paper with a less smooth surface (we worked with two surfaces). It's a self-masking printing-out process, so landscapes that would otherwise take a good deal of dodging and burning or a contrast mask to get the sky in the same range as the foreground will print easily in albumen. The effect is much more natural and perfect than an ND grad.

    I'm definitely adding it to the repertoire. I'll try to post some scans tomorrow.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin