Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,587   Posts: 1,545,858   Online: 1147
      
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 69
  1. #11
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,056
    Images
    1
    I'm kinda mixed. On the one hand, it is something like a technological breakthrough (on a personal scale) and I can almost feel your excitment coming through the wires. I am excited for / with you. On the other hand, the pragmatist in me is thinking "geez, we've gotta have at least ten good years left yet before it comes to this".

  2. #12
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    I like it!

    But then again, that might just the "mad scientist" in me...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #13
    athanasius80's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Huntington Beach, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    639
    Images
    15
    Why do it? Because I can.

  4. #14
    127
    127 is offline
    127's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    uk
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    581
    Because it allows you to "own the process" (in a conceptual way rather than a legal way).

    I designed and built a camera out of MDF. One of the first test images is on the wall - because _I_ made it. It's not a great camera, but thats not the point.

    The "easy" thing to do is get a digital point and shoot, but that turns the whole process into "magic" in a very real way. There's a box with a button, and a picture comes out - how it does it is beyond comprehension. How can they take credit for that image?

    Transparency and ownership, are the joy of the film camera - particularly LF. You can show a five year old how it works. There's no "magic box", and the image you make is your own - not the work of a software developer on another continent.

    Making your own film is just one step further - if I make my own film, put it in my own camera, then print it in my own enlarger onto my own paper then I am the master of my kingdom!

    Ian

    P.S. Congrats an making the 100! Keep up the great work, and thanks for keeping us informed of your progress - I'd love to attend a workshop!

  5. #15
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    Congratulations!

    To answer the queastion:
    To further integrate my self with the materials, the process and therefore the results. Why would a ceramist make his own clay, or glaze -- it is known throughout the world that American Standard makes the best clay and store bought glazes and stains are by far and away the most consistent.

    *

  6. #16
    PhotoPete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Waltham, MA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    320
    Because the process is important.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,512
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by mrcallow
    Congratulations!

    To answer the question:
    To further integrate my self with the materials, the process and therefore the results. Why would a ceramist make his own clay, or glaze -- it is known throughout the world that American Standard makes the best clay and store bought glazes and stains are by far and away the most consistent.

    This sums it up in a nutshell. Artists have always sought ways to gain more control over craft. Mark Rothko could only achieve the colors for his field paintings by grinding and mixing his own pigments and glazes. In sculpture, every new material opens up entire new avenues of creativity. Dan Flavin with Flourescent lighting, Serra with Cor-ten steel, Judd with his aluminum and plexiglass minimalist constructions. Acrylics revolutionized the world of painting in the 20th century just as oil based pigments did the same in the 15th century.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  8. #18
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,037
    Images
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    I'm kinda mixed. On the one hand, it is something like a technological breakthrough (on a personal scale) and I can almost feel your excitment coming through the wires. I am excited for / with you. On the other hand, the pragmatist in me is thinking "geez, we've gotta have at least ten good years left yet before it comes to this".
    Brad, you have a very good point, but consider this....

    Most of the emulsion makers are getting rather old to put it mildly. Quite a few of them will not be around in ten years to teach this type of workshop.

    So, when it 'comes to this' there will be no one left to throw out the life preserver to those out there needing the help.

    PE

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    460
    Images
    2
    Because products that exist now, probably won't be available in the future. Because understanding a process gives you better control of the process. Because its fun!
    Last edited by magic823; 11-19-2005 at 12:31 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    The soul never thinks without an image.
    - Aristotle

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    near Ottawa, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    215
    Making one's own tools and "stuff" free's us a bit more from the "predigested" world we live in where any- and everything comes preprepared and shrinkwrapped; or in other words - we become a bit more independant and free (from the keepers of business and industry who give us what they think we want if we pay for it).
    And even if I never ever actually going to make my own emulsions, it's nice to have the KNOWLEDGE for just in case (there's all of a sudden noone around to supply me with film and paper).

    But there's one thing which gives me some grief however. Yes, I would LOOOOOOOVE to attend one of the workshops; but I don't think I'll be able to atend one in the forseeable future though. one the other hand, and while really ony a compromise any way you look at it, why not coming up with a how-to-do cookbook of sorts (like the selfpublished ones they offer on alternativephotography.com) for all the people in a similar situation as me?

    Cheers,
    Chris
    [SIZE=1]Tiptoeing through life's grand theater - and falling down flat.[/SIZE]

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin