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  1. #1
    athanasius80's Avatar
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    Making a cyanotype darker?

    I finally got a source for Arches Platine and compared it to Arches hot press watercolor as my control. The Platine seems to consistantly make a lighter blue than the watercolor paper. I like Platine more and would like to switch to it, so does anyone know a way of making a deeper blue cyanotype? Examples are posted.
    Thanks!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Platine-2.jpg   Hotpress-2.jpg   hotpress camera-2.jpg   platine camera-2.jpg  

  2. #2
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    I don't know if this would work, but you might try soaking the Platine in a weak citric or oxalic acid solution and then drying it before coating the emulsion on it. The paper might be buffered or too neutral/alkaline to achieve a deep blue.

    Also, try using a 2% citric or acetic acid bath as your first bath instead of water, and if you use tap water, be sure to acidify it before placing the prints in it. Cyanotypes like acid environments.

    Joe

  3. #3
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by athanasius80
    I finally got a source for Arches Platine and compared it to Arches hot press watercolor as my control. The Platine seems to consistantly make a lighter blue than the watercolor paper. I like Platine more and would like to switch to it, so does anyone know a way of making a deeper blue cyanotype? Examples are posted.
    Thanks!
    You don't say which formula you are using but if you are using the traditional formula (not the New Cyanotype - Ware formula) try using 2 parts A to 1 part B.
    Clear (develop) in water with a slug of white vinegar.

    Don Bryant

  4. #4

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    If using Mike Ware's formulae, the directions from Photo Formulary include adding a drop or two of concentrated citric acid to the sensitizer just before coating. You might also try a 2nd coat. I'm using Arches Platine, and get a dark blue/grey hue in the shadows.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  5. #5
    nze
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    You may double coat the paper and you will get darker tone. and Arches may be need longer exposure than the watercolor paper.
    Chris Nze
    me Apug Portfolio
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  6. #6
    athanasius80's Avatar
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    I'm using the traditional formula. I'll have to try the 2:1 mix tomorrow.

  7. #7
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    I use Crane Kid Finish Ecru with the 'new' formula -

    run a weakish solution of Hydrogen peroxide over your print near the final wash (i just splash it in randomly until it works, you get used to knowing how much..)

    Dmax instantly goes up - On occasion I have the dark blue going an almost black - sometimes the prints will fizz and bubble, very fun

    I never had a darker print than with the Kid Finish paper (which reminds me I gotta cook up a new batch of sensitiser and to get some prints off to people who helped me when I was a newbie also) -

    Another good pt type paper (COT320) gave me inferior results with cyanotype... Different horses maybe, but i never tried platine
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails blu.jpg  

  8. #8

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    I use strait Hydrogen peroxide on my prints to just darken them a bit. I put in on right after i wash the print (the paper is still wet when i put it on). Once the print dries you can only see a little difference in color.

  9. #9

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    In my knowing using hydrogen peroxide (in whatever way) won't affect the end result. Cyanoype will naturally darken after oxidation with air. Peroxide will just accelerate that phenomenon. Have you made controlled checks? (Comparing two prints of the same image, one left to oxidize naturally for a couple of days and the other oxidized by hydrogen peroxide...)

    BTW in my experience 2A+1B traditional formula won't give you a darker print, in fact it's the opposite. The darkest blues obtainable by single coat Cyanotype can be achieved by mixing A at 25%, B at 12% and use these 1A+1B. (Please note that there's a considerable speed penalty doing so.) Acidifying paper and/or wash water will often help indeed, but beware of the fact that when you do that when it's not really necessary you may experience stain.

    As a last note, when compatible (read as a paper with no buffer which has good/even absorption) thin papers usually give higher dmax.

    Regards,
    Loris.

  10. #10

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    try longer exposure.

    BTW, I have been able to achieve nice Dmax, very near neutral blacks, and a nice tonal range using a carbonate bleach and redevelopment with Gallic acid. It is a bit tricky as atmospheric oxidation at the wrong stage will lead to bleeding of the image. I continue to refine the process but it has a lot of potential.

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