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  1. #11
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    I made ziatypes last winter (when I was learning) and used a room humidifier to humidify each sheet of paper as my area was in the 30-40% humidity range during the winter. At the moment, my thermometer/humidity device says 80.6 deg F and 24 % humidity. Mind you, the temp will go down after I turn off the heat for a while after my husband leaves for the evening.

    However, I am also planning to do DOP Pd also. I just haven't mixed the chems yet.
    Diane

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  2. #12
    nze
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    Hello Alex,

    I started with Ziatype and find it is a great process. I like because it give real good black without any double coating. But when I start printing some portfolio for other photographer, I switch to traditional. WHy??? Because it was harder to print 20 similar print with zia than with traditionnal. Another point is that I now use a vacuum printer, which need a little more care for printing ziatype.

    If you ever want to start at low cost , I think you should start with Kallitype . I do some platinum and palladium toned kallitype at the moment , as described by Sandy on unblinkingeye and it is a great pleasure to work with this process.

    Platinunm palladium are truely easy to do , there are so few step that when you start printing palladium it is hard to work with another because there is no easier process than this one, development and clearing that' all .
    Chris Nze
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  3. #13
    nze
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    Diane I use the same palladium for zia and DOp. I just change of ferric salt.
    What ever the process I always mix lithium palladium and just change the ferris calt from double to single.
    Chris Nze
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  4. #14
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone. Much good info. Looks like Zia is out for me because of the humidity control. Looking forward to getting started here in the new year. First, there's that UV box to build. Many thanks again.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  5. #15

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    My advice would be to start with either straight palladium or palladium toned kallitype. In fact, since the working procedures and contrast contrals are virtually identical for both processes, with one set of chemicals you can do both. Both are DOP processes that give images of virtually the same color and tonal range. And whichever you choose to start with, transition to the other is a very easy step.

    Palladium toned kallitype is without question the most economical, and the skills you learn with it are about 95% applicable to straight palladium, and to Pt./Pd. also. However, straight palladium DOP with dichromate contrast control is not terribly expensive either.

    Sandy



    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley
    Scanning through the various pt/pd processes, seems like the Ziatype or palladium (pd) print is a good place to start.

    The downside I see with the Zia is needing to control relative humidity in the paper/processing room. I have no idea what the typical relative humidity in my home is, but its well below the 65% recommended for the ziatype. I have no desire at this point to spend money on humidity control equipment. How big a deal is the humidity control?

    The upside of Zia is it seems relatively inexpensive compared to Pd. Pd seems like more of a wet process, but that's no big deal to me. The downside I see with Pd is its relatively high cost.

    Anyone have any insights or experience to share on this?
    Last edited by sanking; 12-05-2005 at 06:54 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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