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  1. #11

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    Here is a detail of the color glicee print I own but it'sjust a digicam pic and the detail isn't really visible, even enlarged. Nevertheless . . .
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails CHIP-UP.jpg  

  2. #12
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    Why is this thread in the Alt Process section? In the context of the discussion this seems a bit ironic to me.
    No, honestly, I thought that perhaps it was some kind of traditional process, just renamed in a fancy way. Now, that name is SO SO fancy that apparently nobody could get what the actual process was...

    Today I would place it at least in the "grey area", most probably...
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  3. #13
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poptart
    Glicee (zee-clay') is an old printing process, not digital. It is a variation on the offset litho, I believe, and was generally viewed as a cheap alternative to art litho, but lately it's gained a new following. I have a glicee print that I'll attach a part of for reference if I still have it scanned--to follow.
    Well, yes, perhaps some time ago. You know: as much as computer imaging is called "photography" these days.

    It's mostly self-explanative the fact that if you just slap the words "True black fine-art glicée" in google, the first result is:

    Inkjet News and Tips 01 June 05 :rolleyes:
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

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