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  1. #1
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Fancy names for conventional processes?

    Hi there, and sorry if this topic will perhaps not fit the cathegory in the end.

    The new fashion in this digital-all era is to rename the goodol' things everybody used to do every day with misterious and ascetic names, just to have something mean shine as if it was special. I have recently been to an exhibition in Torino where perfectly normal inkjet prints were renamed "ultrasonic something photocolor" and perfectly normal b/w photographs were named with the alchemic term "silver salts paper" instead of the usual "gelatine silver bromide etc.", perhaps to raise the suspect that the paper was handmade recreating the old salted paper process (it was an ordinary Ilford Multigrade in best case scenario). Well, among all, one name I really couldn't associate to anything I know was:

    "True black fine-art glicee" (SIC, no italian to english translation)

    with a tonic accent on the first "e", a la francaise. What is that? A coal inkjet print perhaps?
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  2. #2

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    I saw 'toned carbon pigment giclee' in the B&W last issue. Gives me a mouth full of marbles.
    In the unlikely event I ever have my images hanging in a gallery somewhere I will call them 'prints'.

  3. #3
    roteague's Avatar
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    I don't know about traditional processes, but I dislike the term "dry" darkroom. What is wrong with calling it as it is? A computer workstation.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  4. #4
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    I don't know about traditional processes, but I dislike the term "dry" darkroom. What is wrong with calling it as it is? A computer workstation.
    This also gets right under my skin along with 'digital darkroom'. My personal opinion is that it stems from the user being too embarrassed to admit they do computer imaging.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  5. #5

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    To me, my Dry Darkroom is just that - no wet chemical processing in that darkroom - just film loading (into holders, tanks and reels) plus enlarging and contact printing. I do the wet processing in a completely separate lab - been doing it that way for 30 - 40 years.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  6. #6
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    To me, my Dry Darkroom is just that - no wet chemical processing in that darkroom - just film loading (into holders, tanks and reels) plus enlarging and contact printing. I do the wet processing in a completely separate lab - been doing it that way for 30 - 40 years.
    True Tom, but the majority of those using this term really mean a computer and a printer.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    So the next time someone says "dry darkroom," you can just ask, "is that where you load your holders?"
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #8
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Gilardetti
    Hi there, and sorry if this topic will perhaps not fit the cathegory in the end.

    The new fashion in this digital-all era is to rename the goodol' things everybody used to do every day with misterious and ascetic names, just to have something mean shine as if it was special. I have recently been to an exhibition in Torino where perfectly normal inkjet prints were renamed "ultrasonic something photocolor" and perfectly normal b/w photographs were named with the alchemic term "silver salts paper" instead of the usual "gelatine silver bromide etc.", perhaps to raise the suspect that the paper was handmade recreating the old salted paper process (it was an ordinary Ilford Multigrade in best case scenario). Well, among all, one name I really couldn't associate to anything I know was:

    "True black fine-art glicee" (SIC, no italian to english translation)

    with a tonic accent on the first "e", a la francaise. What is that? A coal inkjet print perhaps?
    Why is this thread in the Alt Process section? In the context of the discussion this seems a bit ironic to me.

    Don Bryant

  9. #9

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    Glicee (zee-clay') is an old printing process, not digital. It is a variation on the offset litho, I believe, and was generally viewed as a cheap alternative to art litho, but lately it's gained a new following. I have a glicee print that I'll attach a part of for reference if I still have it scanned--to follow.

  10. #10

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    Adolph Hitler’s regime promoted the theory that if you repeat a lie loud enough and often enough the masses will believe it is true.

    Digital imaging equipment is marketed to the masses.

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