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  1. #21
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    Just for the record, somebody posted a message ( not sure if on another thread on apug.org. or elsewhere) that the spiral BLB tubes can not be used in horizontal orientation due to the nature of the ballast. I have no idea if this is true, but I know for a fact that it was said, and the poster did seem pretty confident of the information.
    Can't say for certain that BLB spirals are the same hardware, just with different phosophor/filter coating, but I have compact fluorescent bulbs in my kitchen fixture (got tired of changing the tungsten bulbs every 3-4 weeks). That fixture mounts the lamps horizontally, and though they do work well enough in that orientation, they're very dim when they first start; I have no way to be sure if that's due to orientation or temperature, however.

    Given that VDB is working with a single spiral BLB in a reflector, I'll have to get another reflector (beyond the one that holds my 1950s vintage safelight bulb) and order in a BLB CFL. Then I can start working on cyanotypes and such without being dependent on sunshine (or working in the day, for that matter).
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  2. #22
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    Can't say for certain that BLB spirals are the same hardware, just with different phosophor/filter coating, but I have compact fluorescent bulbs in my kitchen fixture (got tired of changing the tungsten bulbs every 3-4 weeks). That fixture mounts the lamps horizontally, and though they do work well enough in that orientation, they're very dim when they first start; I have no way to be sure if that's due to orientation or temperature, however.
    CLF's are notorious for their annoying "warm-up" characteristic. In some instances, it takes a minute or more for a CLF to reach full light output.

    Most folks who use spiral BLBs for printing simply preheat the bulbs for a minute before starting the exposure. Since exposures in alternative processes are typicaly minutes, a little non-linearity is not normally a problem.

    FWIW, I've studied the application of CFLs in our home pretty carefully. The basic economic analysis leads me to conclude that applications that are "on" for more than about 45 minutes per day will recover the higher cost of the CFL with the energy savings within the first year, so I've replaced every incandescent bulb that gets lots of usage. My next round of replacements will be where its a PITA to replace the bulb - have to get out a ladder, remove a cover, etc. I will not replace the bulbs where there is a need for the lamp to provide full output immediately (ie, the bathroom - when you stumble in there in the middle of the night, you need light NOW!), nor will I replace bulbs outdoors - CFLs don't start well when the ambient temperature is very cold.

  3. #23

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    You are absolutely right about this. I have tested the output of the spiral BLB tubes with an integrator and it takes at least 45 seconds from start-up to full output. But no problem, just turn them on and allow them to warm up for a minute or so and you are ready to go.

    I do recommend some precaution in where you place the lights. Using them in a reflector suggests that they will be at or above eye level so you should take steps to cover or enclose the bulbs when exposing. Or wear UV googles.


    Sandy



    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto
    CLF's are notorious for their annoying "warm-up" characteristic. In some instances, it takes a minute or more for a CLF to reach full light output.

  4. #24
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto
    I will not replace the bulbs where there is a need for the lamp to provide full output immediately (ie, the bathroom - when you stumble in there in the middle of the night, you need light NOW!), nor will I replace bulbs outdoors - CFLs don't start well when the ambient temperature is very cold.
    If I'm stumbling into the bathroom in the dead of night, and it's dark, and my eyes are fully adapted, the dim, weak startup from a CFL is likely to be a) plenty of light, and b) more than my eyes really want anyway. About 2 white LEDs would be just right for that situation. The place I won't (based on experience) put CFLs is where they need to operate in very cold ambient temperatures. I used to have one in a back porch light, and when it was below freezing out, I might as well have had a candle in a Chinese paper lantern.

    So, even though it's a major pain in the arse to replace the bulb in my carport light (disassemble the fixture, while standing on a ladder I don't own), it won't get a CFL, because when I want it, I want actual light, not a dim ghost of luminance...

    My plan for a CF-BLB in a reflector is to put it as low as will evenly cover my prints, in order to give the shortest exposures. I figure for 8x10 that will probably be below eye level with the prints on the bathroom, er, darkroom counter. This whole plan might get sidetracked, however, if Cyanotype Rex turns out to be as easy as it's looking; that process is fast enough and UV-independent enough I might be able to expose it under my enlarger -- even to the point of enlarging onto it! If that goes, I won't need a UV light source any time real soon...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

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