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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    Others have given you much better advice than could I. I would add only one thought. If you have Potassium Ferricyanide in your darkroom make very certain that they can not come in contact with each other because the effects could be deadly and the dead would not necessarily include you.
    Thanks for the thought, it has entered my mind. I'm thinking right now of a good way to keep these chemicals safe from eachother and other people. Potassium ferricyanide, or as I think it's called in Sweden kaliumhexacyanoferrat (III), can turn into cyanide gas if exposed to heat or an acid. The Pot. ferri. will probably be stored at my friends darkroom. Safe enough?

  2. #22

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    And thank you everyone for your tips! I feel a little more prepared for the task now. I'm also glad I'm not dealing with barrelfuls of these things...

  3. #23

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    Back to the original topic. You are right to be concerned about handling concentrated sulfuric acid. It is a heavy, viscous liquid that can be quite difficult. The measuring container should be dry, although a speck of moisture will not be a problem. Concentrated sulfuric acid does emit noxious fumes (sulfur dioxide) in a moist or even high humidity situation. They are not usually a problem unless you really get your nose in them. If you spill any of the acid, immediately (_immediately_!!!) flood the area of the spill with plenty of water, and keep the water going for several minutes. If you spill it on your clothing, strip off the clothing immediately and flood any area that may even possibly touched the acid with water. Then wash out the clothing, which will be ruined. This sort of thing happens all the time in the lab, which is why lab workers wear safety glasses and all sorts of protective gear. At the very least, wear glasses and an apron. Rubber gloves help too, if you can handle the glassware decently with them.

    The substitute bleach using sodium bisulfate is probably a good idea. The bisulfate forms (dilute) sulfuric acid when it is dissolved in water. Dichromate is a possible carcinogen, but it is OK to handle small quantities (and even dispose of them down the drain in most places) without any significant danger. Permanganate has been used as a substitute bleach, but I don't have a formula handy. You might check the Kodak website under motion picture processing. (I think the document is H-34, but I'm not sure.)

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth
    Back to the original topic. You are right to be concerned about handling concentrated sulfuric acid. It is a heavy, viscous liquid that can be quite difficult.
    Yes, I have read it's quite viscous. The advantage to that is that it "moves" slowly, and is less likely to splash everywhere if my hands are a bit unsteady.

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