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  1. #21
    JG Motamedi's Avatar
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    I am not so sure that there is really much difference between rottenstone and whiting. After all, they are both essentially calcium. However, in my use I have noticed that whiting appears to clean slightly better, but at the same time its residues (being white) are more noticeable. I actually had more problems with fogging when I was using rottenstone.

    Just a thought: It would be a lot of fun someday to hold a wet-plate conference/get together. The CW crowd have their "jamboree" every year at John Coffer's place way out in Dundee, NY (and I am sure we would be welcomed), but I often feel that our (if I can lump us all together) or at least my non-technical needs are often quite different. Perhaps I should post idea on Quinn's site.

  2. #22
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    I'd certainly be up for a conference. I'm also hoping I'll be invited to John Coffer's Jamboree in July after my Memorial Day weekend workshop with him in Dundee. I'm somehow hoping to stretch my trip to Peters Valley for your dag workshop into the Jamboree a week or so later, maybe visiting some friends on the east coast and then photographing my way back home at a leisurely pace.

    Here's another thought I've been kicking around related to oysters and such: I'm wondering if somehow taking a whetstone over the glass edge is creating a multitude of little pockets for whiting or small glass chips to collect in which ultimately form nuclei for oysters and comets. I'm going to try chemically cleaning the glass and then just subbing the edge with albumen rather than dulling the edge first with a stone and using whiting to clean it.

    Joe

  3. #23

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    I am curious, When you say 'black glass' it it really black glass or painted glass or glass backed with a black something?

    Thanks,

    Corey

  4. #24
    Kerik's Avatar
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    Black glass. Available from stained glass suppliers. Most people seem to be using Spectrum 1009S Cathedral Glass. It's the kind...
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
    www.kerik.com
    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

  5. #25
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik
    D'oh!!!! Thanks for pointing out my error. I now see that I made a typo in my first post, then it got perpetuated. I use POTASSIUM cyanide (KCN), NOT hydrogen cyanide (HCN). I should have spelled it out rather than fat-fingering the abbreviation. So, Donald, perhaps that's what you meant by being confused. I'm not confused, but I am a crappy typist.

    In any case, I suppose I should emphasize that no-one should delve into processes like wet plate, daguerrotype or anything involving dichromates without understanding the hazards and proper handling of these materials. I apologize for any confusion I may have induced.
    Okay, you're using potassium cyanide -- hazardous, but not unmanageable. If you'd read all of my post, you'd have seen me spelling it out a couple times, in a manner that should have made it clear which one I was referring to in which context.

    Bad typing is less hazardous *to you* than chemical confusion, but could be just as bad to someone coming in late, as it were (though I agree that anyone starting to learn wet plate had better have their act together -- collodion, ether, and cyanide are all pretty hazardous to work in a closed room; darkrooms used to burn down pretty regularly when wet plate was *it* and safelights had a candle inside).

    And in between then and now, I've been corresponding on a mailing list with a guy who thinks it'll be perfectly okay to machine the cylinder of his black powder revolver to take modern smokeless cartridges. Please pardon my reaction -- I'd rather jump on someone who's doing it right than read a headline about someone I didn't jump on...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

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