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  1. #1

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    Sizing paper & exposure time questions???

    I'm starting to print Kallitypes and did a couple test prints of step tablets today.

    I am using Stonehenge paper, and I double coated it. I didn't size the paper before hand. The paper cleared well after washing, and the whites looked white... But looking at the back of the paper it seemed like the solution soaked in and darkened it in areas, but didn't effect the quality of the image on the front. Should I be sizing every paper I use before I print? If so, is the arrowroot I bought ok for sizing?

    The other question I have is about exposure time. How do I determine it? I did a test for 2.5 minutes, then developed, toned, and fixed the print. After it dried I looked at it, the blacks were very black, and I stayed with the time. But now I'm thinking maybe I should try to shorten the time. I didn't expect to have such fast exposures. I think if I shorten the time it will help be build better curves from the step tablet and have my middle values more centered.

    I appreciate any advice or suggestions you have.

    Regards,
    Martin

  2. #2

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    Any advice?

    Maybe my question wasn't clear... If anyone needs me to clear up some points, let me know and I will attempt to do just that.

    Regards,
    Martin

  3. #3
    Troy's Avatar
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    Hi there,

    Sizing advice: First check to see if your paper already has sizing. Many high quality watercolor papers do. If so, this is generally enough. Van Dykes and Kallitypes definitely need sizing. Arrowroot is a very, very safe sizing. They make cookies for babies out of it. But it's not the most effective method. Better choices are gelatin, gesso or gum arabic. Get Christopher James' book "The Book of Alternative Photographic Processes" for the skinny on everything you want to know and more.

  4. #4
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy
    Hi there,

    Sizing advice: First check to see if your paper already has sizing. Many high quality watercolor papers do. If so, this is generally enough. Van Dykes and Kallitypes definitely need sizing. Arrowroot is a very, very safe sizing. They make cookies for babies out of it. But it's not the most effective method. Better choices are gelatin, gesso or gum arabic. Get Christopher James' book "The Book of Alternative Photographic Processes" for the skinny on everything you want to know and more.
    Troy,

    I have to disagree with you about the sizing for Stonehenge. You can print VDB and kallitypes just fine with that paper without sizing. C. James book is quite informative but not always accurate. But if you want to size you can but that will change the printing characteristics of the paper. Arrowroot will create warmer tones than gelatin sizing. In general I avoid papers that require sizing for iron based processes, it's just an unecessary nuisance.

    As for Martin's question about printing times: If step one of the step tablet has the same density as the uncovered coated areas and has not merged with step 2 then the base printing time has been determined. However the actual time for printing negatives will be longer since adequate exposure for film base plus fog needs to be accounted for. Not to mention the need to evaluate how the shadow areas print detail.

    In alt processes we print for the dark tones and adjust contrast for the highlights, just the opposite of silver gelatin.

    Quote Originally Posted by menglert
    I think if I shorten the time it will help be build better curves from the step tablet and have my middle values more centered.
    Sounds like you are testing for digital negatives? If so then perhaps we should continue this discussion in the Gray area.

    Don Bryant




    As for

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the suggestions...

    Someone else I was talking with suggested the darker areas on the back of the print may be due to the fact the paper wasn't dried completely after coating... This makes sense, considering how soon I started the exposure after application.

    I'll try a few more test prints this weekend without sizing, and see how it works out.

    I'll also work on a proper exposure time keeping your suggestions in mind. You are correct, in that I'm using digital negatives from scans. But during exposure I used a blank negative to account for it during exposure. I understand if you'd like to move the topic to the subforum. The reason I posted here was because it was more general questions about exposure / paper, as oppsed to any questions about digital processes.

    Thanks again everyone.

    Regards,
    Martin



 

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