Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,986   Posts: 1,523,984   Online: 845
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    donbga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format Pan
    Posts
    2,058

    Gum Overs - What pigment colors are being used

    Hi Folks,

    I was looking at Michael Mutmansky's web page a few minutes ago admiring his gum overs, impressed with the depth and color of the images there.

    I've also peeked at Clay Harmon's and Kerik Kouklis's web pages and have noted that they both achieve an added sense of depth with their gum overs.

    I imagine that most if not all of their gum over work utilizes multiple gum layers and perhaps pigments.

    Anyway I was curious about what color pigments people are using and why.

    Don Bryant

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    State College, PA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    336
    Don,

    It's a witch's brew mostly. For the sepia brown look, many people use a lot of burnt umber, but normally, there are other colors in there as well in smaller amounts.

    Actually, I've found that BU looks very different from different paint manufacturers, so it does depend somewhat on the paint you choose to use.

    Colors I use a good bit are:
    burnt umber
    sepia brown
    ivory black
    windsor blue
    indian yellow

    There's many others, and depending on the manufacturer, they may have different names and slightly different effects.

    The process of making a combination gum bichromate and palladium print is iterative, and sometimes when I'm trying out new colors, it doesn't work out, and the print goes into the circular file.

    My prints typically have two or three gum layers over the palladium base print. The darker ones often have four layers of gum, and lighter ones may only have one.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  3. #3
    Kerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,465
    Images
    238
    Sorry, but that's classified. :o
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
    www.kerik.com
    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    State College, PA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    336
    Kerik,

    I'm not too worried about divulging some of the pigments; it's the sequence of chants that I say as I mix the goo that is important anyway.

    Interestingly, with gum, you can give the same materials to three different printers, and you'll get three different results. All right, or all wrong, depending on which gummist you you may ask. That is one of the real beauties of gum.

    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  5. #5
    clay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Asheville, North Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,118
    Images
    8
    I'm with Kerik here. We can't very well have people chasing down the poisonous toads we use for some of the pigments. And I darn well am not going to reveal where I find my rhodonite and green garnets to crush. This is really for their own safety.
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


    http://www.clayharmon.net - turnip extraordinaire

  6. #6
    donbga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format Pan
    Posts
    2,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Mutmansky
    Don,

    It's a witch's brew mostly. For the sepia brown look, many people use a lot of burnt umber, but normally, there are other colors in there as well in smaller amounts.

    Actually, I've found that BU looks very different from different paint manufacturers, so it does depend somewhat on the paint you choose to use.

    Colors I use a good bit are:
    burnt umber
    sepia brown
    ivory black
    windsor blue
    indian yellow

    There's many others, and depending on the manufacturer, they may have different names and slightly different effects.

    The process of making a combination gum bichromate and palladium print is iterative, and sometimes when I'm trying out new colors, it doesn't work out, and the print goes into the circular file.

    My prints typically have two or three gum layers over the palladium base print. The darker ones often have four layers of gum, and lighter ones may only have one.


    ---Michael
    Thanks Michael,

    For me working with gum has been at times quite magical and at others very discouraging, but I think the best way to learn how to print with gum is to just do it rather than read about it.

    I use M. Graham pigments and for gum overs I've been working with:

    Raw Sienna
    Burnt Sienna
    Burnt Umber
    Ivory Black
    Azo Yellow
    New Gamboge

    Since I work with very thin layers of gum I've never been quite happy with one layer of gum as I perfer a stronger color rendering. And yes I've had a lot of failures but I just file them away.

    I'm also thinking of trying Quinacridone Rose or Violet in a mix for an effect in the darker tones. There are just too many choices.

    Thanks,

    Don

  7. #7
    Kerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,465
    Images
    238
    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    I think the best way to learn how to print with gum is to just do it rather than read about it.
    Bingo.
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
    www.kerik.com
    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    FRANCE
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    13
    Do you expose the gum layer directly under UV light or are you exposing with the negative ?
    Thanks
    Pierre

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    State College, PA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    I'm also thinking of trying Quinacridone Rose or Violet in a mix for an effect in the darker tones. There are just too many choices.
    Don,

    There's many color choices out there, and I have a cabinet full of pigments to prove it. I figure you won't know until you try a color on a sheet, so I often make multiple base prints of an image, figuring that the less than perfect ones will be sacrificed to testing purposes.

    One way to reduce the color choices a bit is to only use pure pigment colors, rather than pigment blends. That will take 2/3 of some manufacturer's paints out of the equation, and since they are all blends, you could achieve the same effect with the same component pigments. Another way to reduce the number is to ensure that you are only using the best pigments from a lightfastness perspective.

    Once you do these two things, there will still be a bunch, but it will be a much smaller set to choose from. The M Graham paints are good as they are mostly pure pigments. I have some here to try but I haven't gotten to them yet. Of course, it's possible to make great gum prints with any pigment source.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    State College, PA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by ZELER
    Do you expose the gum layer directly under UV light or are you exposing with the negative ?
    Thanks
    Pierre
    Pierre,

    You can do anything you want, but most prints are done with the negative so the gum has proportional density related to the image.

    I've done a bit without the negative, but you have to be very careful to avoid blocking up th highlights with color. It generally doesn't work as an effect for me.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin