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  1. #1

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    Gum v.s Casein printing

    I wondered if anyone can help me with casein printing, much like gum printing. Has anyone tried it? I have all supplies collected except for exposure light. I am not sure with the crazy weather here and multiple other reasons I can get repeatable results with the sun- except for the effect on me.
    I have seen mentioned UV light and mercy light sources. Any enlighten would be welcomed. Thanks Sharon

  2. #2

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    Sharon,

    I tried casein printing many years ago. A friend of mine, Jerry Ellison,was in contact with Franklin Enos (see article: http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/Casein/casein.html) who was the undisputed master of casein printing. Jerry shared Franklin's formulas and procedures with me, and we both attempted to reproduce his results. While I was able to make images that were on a par with gum prints, I was never able to achieve the long tonal range prints that were standard for Enos. I have a single example of Mr. Enos's work that is nothing short of magic if you consider it was done in one printing.

    In hindsight, I think the problems that we experienced were directly related to the quality of the casein that we were using. We prepared our casein, starting with powdered milk, as described in the article I referenced. Whether it was a function of the powdered milk we used, or the ammonia, I don't think we obtained very good casein. Since I did not communicate directly with Mr. Enos, I have no idea if he employed this method of making casein, or if he obtained it in some other manner.

    Anyway, that was my experience. If you can figure out how to achieve a long tonal range, this process is capable of excellent results.

    Allen

  3. #3

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    Casein is one of my favorite processes; I most of the time prefer it over gum - perhaps just because I got used to it. I buy the casein from Kremer pigments and dissolve it in household ammonia. Examples are here:
    http://www.photographie.de/magazin/werth.cfm

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukas Werth
    Casein is one of my favorite processes; I most of the time prefer it over gum - perhaps just because I got used to it. I buy the casein from Kremer pigments and dissolve it in household ammonia. Examples are here:
    http://www.photographie.de/magazin/werth.cfm

    Very nice work. I think I should buy some casein and mix my own and do samples of both. Now I just need to work out the light sourse. Thanks for the help.

  5. #5

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    As for the light source: UV-tubes serve well, perhaps you are able to get hold of an old light unit of a tanning solon, or a unit for home tanning. I built my own light table from UV tubes, mercury vapour also is supposed to work very well, and is supposed to give more contrast. Sun light is too independable.

  6. #6
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    If you want a decent source of UV for not too much money, try Home Depot. They have (at least around here in the DC area) GE fluorescent black light fixtures. The tubes are about 18" long. The whole set including the cord, switch, and ballast is about $16-18. A couple dollars more than the bulb by itself. I bought six of them and screwed them onto the bottom of a shelf. I use the shelf below as my exposure stage (for pt/pd). With the six fixtures, I can print up to 11x14 easily, and I could probably manage a 16x20.
    I wouldn't use a home tanning unit- they emit too much of the harmful wavelength UV light making them a hazard to be around.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera
    If you want a decent source of UV for not too much money, try Home Depot. They have (at least around here in the DC area) GE fluorescent black light fixtures. The tubes are about 18" long. The whole set including the cord, switch, and ballast is about $16-18. A couple dollars more than the bulb by itself. I bought six of them and screwed them onto the bottom of a shelf. I use the shelf below as my exposure stage (for pt/pd). With the six fixtures, I can print up to 11x14 easily, and I could probably manage a 16x20.
    I wouldn't use a home tanning unit- they emit too much of the harmful wavelength UV light making them a hazard to be around.
    Thanks! This seems to be a reasonable route and I will try it. Any thoughts on starting exposure time? Do I just do a exposure test strip? Again THANKS!



 

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