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  1. #11
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera
    For my first foray into Cyanotypes I was using Arches Platine. I have some socorro and some COT 320 to try as well...

    To reiterate, I was having no problem achieving a good dense dmax. To get detail in the highlights and not have acres of paper white showing in the white area of the image, I was getting blocked up shadows that were going too dark and losing detail.

    I'm using the B&S Cyanotype kit. Where can I get the Mike Ware kit?
    B&S may have it is well as Photographers Formulary, but it is very easy to make yourself.

    From what you describe you need a softer tonal range and just switching to the Ware formula will most likely give just as contrasty or more contrasty results. Why not try the citirc acid first.
    Don Bryant

  2. #12
    John_Brewer's Avatar
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    I would try acid in the first water bath, it's the easiest and cheapest option to experiment with to reduce contrast. I use acetic acid, (because I have a lot of it), but other acids like citric work well too or use white vinegar. Different papers have different tonal scales as Don has said too. Sizing and adding or omitting Tween also affects contrast.

    J
    ~John~
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    www.johnbrewerphotography.com
    There are 10 types of people in this world - those who understand binary and those who don't.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    From what you describe you need a softer tonal range and just switching to the Ware formula will most likely give just as contrasty or more contrasty results. Why not try the citirc acid first.
    (Btw, in my first comment I seem to have repeated some of your suggestion; I overlooked your first post)

    The Ware process gives a considerably longer tonal scale than normal cyanotype, you can even print negs which work as salt prints, or Pt/pd pop. Its tonal scale is just as rich as any platinum print might be, and the darkest blue is very nearly black, giving the picture a richness and luminance which may be achievable - or nearly so - also with normal cyanotype, but only with special precautions, making the process more complicated as its reputation would have it.

    In my view, New cyanotypes have two disadvantages: 1) the process is very sensitive to the paper base, and generally more difficult to coat, 2) - I think, though I have only made one or two very preliminary tests - they don't tone as well as normal cyanotypes.

    Mike Ware gives very good instructions on his website, though I use hydrochloric acid instead of nitric for the first bath, because it is easier for me to get (he used to recommend this also, but changed it).

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