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  1. #1

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    Liquid Light issues...

    Hello its me again with more problems I originally started using liquid light and was having these crazy problems with it. If I exposed it for longer than 2 seconds at the lowest light setting it would go very black. So I was only able to create the faintest of images. So I assumed it was just me since there was in fact an image however faint. But I put it aside b/c I was becoming quite irritated after using half the bottle to no avail. I stored it under the cereal cabinet in the kitchen. I went back to it about two weeks later and still every photograph was coming out black. So I got suspicious and put a bit on a piece of paper without exposing it and developed it and it too turned black. How is it possible that the liquid light became exposed when I only used it in the darkroom and it was only open long enough to be poured? I'm very confused and its a bit too expensive for me to go about wasting half bottles so if anyone has any idea as to what it could be I would appreciate the input.
    Thanks so much,
    Erin

  2. #2

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    I think the emulsion is fogged. Did you buy it recently? If so, the complaint should go to the store...

    Emulsions age, particularly fast at elevated temperature. Emulsion scientists and engineers know many ways to slow it down, but never stop. If the bottle was transported or stored in poor conditions, it can be all fogged, and that seems to be your case. Unfortunately, there is no good way to remove fog from fogged emulsion.


    Another possibility is that the paper you are using is fogging the emulsion. I always tell people never to pour back emulsion that ever touched paper because of this risk. (Most paper stocks contain agents used to destroy lignin, etc., which can fog emulsion.)

  3. #3

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    Thanks, but I didn't really want to take it back to the person who sold it to me because I've already used half the bottle trying to get it too work. But it was also the first time I used liquid light and so there is a high possibility that I did something detremental too it. I just didn't want too assume that it was a problem from the get go. Although he had it just sitting out in the store on a shelf and since "nobody uses liquid light anymore" it had been there forever. They all got a real kick out of the fact that I asked for it. But the experation was in 2007. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't making any terrible mistakes. I did however try to save the emulsion and stick what wasn't used back in the bottle, so if that causes a problem then that was all me. Its also what I get for being cheap

  4. #4
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    Erin;

    It is rather rare to get paper that will fog an emulsion like liquid light.

    I have used 4 different kinds of paper right from my art store locally and have found none that fog the emulsion directly, but only with keeping over several weeks.

    I doubt that is your problem. I think that the emulsion was kept poorly in the store and went into fog. If the very first sample you took was foggy, the obviously you had not poured anything back into the container and the emulsion was bad right then.

    PE

  5. #5
    raucousimages's Avatar
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    I think your bottle was opened.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

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    This couldnt be the source of your initial problems, but you should know that frequent reheating of LL supposedly fogs it too. Its best to decant the large bottle into small containers (film cans work) the first time you liquify it, so they only have to be reheated 1-2 times more.

    J and C should have their inexpensive Adolux emulsion in again shortly (mid-month I was told), if you want a cheaper way to go next time. I havent used it but I intend to try it unless someone says I shouldnt.


    Wayne

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by raucousimages
    I think your bottle was opened.
    me too, i think someone opened it by mistake, either at the store, or where you have been storing it.

    i've used liquid light off and on since 1986-7 and never had problems as was described. i used to even pour unused emulsion back into the bottle, never had problems either. maybe i was just lucky.

  8. #8
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    If you can find a copy, a very good book on this process is :Silver Gelatin by Martin Reed & Sarah Jones published by Aurum Press.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    It is rather rare to get paper that will fog an emulsion like liquid light.

    I have used 4 different kinds of paper right from my art store locally and have found none that fog the emulsion directly, but only with keeping over several weeks.
    That's probably because your emulsions are not sufficiently sensitized to increase the number of shallow electron traps in the right places. If you digest a pint of emulsion in a tiny piece of paper (most paper will do) for 20 minutes, most well sensitized chloride, chloroiodobromide and chlorobromide emulsions will fog very badly. Fog may occur in the coating system where the emulsion and paper come in contact. For comparison, if I wash the paper thoroughly and inertize the impurity in the paper, this doesn't affect at all, even with longer digestion with a piece of paper.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryuji
    That's probably because your emulsions are not sufficiently sensitized to increase the number of shallow electron traps in the right places. If you digest a pint of emulsion in a tiny piece of paper (most paper will do) for 20 minutes, most well sensitized chloride, chloroiodobromide and chlorobromide emulsions will fog very badly. Fog may occur in the coating system where the emulsion and paper come in contact. For comparison, if I wash the paper thoroughly and inertize the impurity in the paper, this doesn't affect at all, even with longer digestion with a piece of paper.
    That is not correct.

    My emulsions are sensitized with sulfur for up to 1 hour at 60 deg C. They show no sensitivity to the various papers that I have used to coat them on. I have tested them fresh and after keeping. The ISO speed, as reported before, when coated on paper, has ranged up to ISO 200. The average enlarging speed on-easel is equivalent to Multigrade IV paper, which is my speed and curve shape reference. The Dmin is comparable to the reference as well.

    If I have had fog, it was due to safelight fog with a long green sensitizing dye, or overfinish, or too much dopant. It has never been due to the paper itself.

    Carrying out the digestion of an emulsion of any sort in the presence of paper is not common practice. I believe that the high temperature of this mixture has misled you if you use it for test purposes.

    In any event, I have posted prints made from my sulfur sensitzed emulsions here on APUG, which were coated on Strathmore Smooth paper, obtainable from any art supply store. This is just one of dozens of types of paper that I have tried. I will have samples of these to show to the addendees of my workshop. The results speak for themselves.

    PE

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