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  1. #11

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    Many brands of table salt contain a little bit (like .001 percent) of ferricyanide. Even this small amount will kill the speed of most alternative processes.

  2. #12

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    Mike,

    People use various salts (at least the ones that work well) for PT/PD printing. I think that it comes down to personal preference based on the color results mostly. I like ammonium chloride.

    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Mutmansky
    Mike,

    People use various salts (at least the ones that work well) for PT/PD printing. I think that it comes down to personal preference based on the color results mostly. I like ammonium chloride.

    ---Michael
    Michael, Thanks for the info - so from what I have learned (from the many good folks here) sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, lithium chloride and cesium chloride are used (is there a reference as to what the color shift is with each?). Has anyone ever tried copper chloride and if so what were the results like? Are there other salts that are less common...

    Sorry to OP, do not mean to hijack the thread.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  4. #14

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    Mike,

    I presume every viable salt has been tried as some time in the past.

    There are double salts that may be viable as well, though, so it could get complicated to test everything.

    I think at least some of the final appearence is related to working methods and developer chosen, along with the paper, so there are many variables to lock down to do a comparison test.

    I compared sodium, lithium and ammonium at one time and noted the differences in the results. Each has it's merits for specific things, but I generally liked the look of the ammonium version for general work.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  5. #15

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    Pickling salt is usually free of additives since it's desirable for brines to be clear and colorless. I have used Morton pickling salt in making a Microdol substitute and have not noticed any adverse effect. However, it's good to make your own tests.

  6. #16
    photo8x10's Avatar
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    Thank you very much,
    I've read your posts with attention, so I'll find a pure salt do to my palladium solution.

    Best

    Stefano
    Digital is Slow..........Analog is ROCK!!!!

    Visit me at http://www.stefanogermi.com
    Visit My Portfolio in Apug

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Mutmansky
    Mike,

    I presume every viable salt has been tried as some time in the past.

    There are double salts that may be viable as well, though, so it could get complicated to test everything.

    I think at least some of the final appearence is related to working methods and developer chosen, along with the paper, so there are many variables to lock down to do a comparison test.

    I compared sodium, lithium and ammonium at one time and noted the differences in the results. Each has it's merits for specific things, but I generally liked the look of the ammonium version for general work.


    ---Michael
    How do you determine the correct amount of ammonium chloride to use?

    Thanks,
    Don Bryant

  8. #18

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    Michael,

    Why do you prefer ammonium chlroide?

    And would you post a mixing formula of ammonium chloride + palladium, or is it same as with sodium chloride?

    Sandy

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Mutmansky
    Mike,

    I presume every viable salt has been tried as some time in the past.

    There are double salts that may be viable as well, though, so it could get complicated to test everything.

    I think at least some of the final appearence is related to working methods and developer chosen, along with the paper, so there are many variables to lock down to do a comparison test.

    I compared sodium, lithium and ammonium at one time and noted the differences in the results. Each has it's merits for specific things, but I generally liked the look of the ammonium version for general work.


    ---Michael

  9. #19

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    I've been using the formula for ammonium palladate in the Ware information on the Ware POP process. It's a little more concentrated than the normal formula, but my tests years ago appeared to indicate that the traditional formulas for FO and PD had a bit of an excess of FO anyway, so I figured it would work fully without waste.

    His formula calls for 1.8 g NH4Cl and 3g PdCl in H2O to make 25ml.

    The molecular weight of Nh4Cl is slightly less than NaCl, but ammonium chloride is hygroscopic, so while you could use essentially the same formula as the traditional sodium chloride, you really should be thinking about a bit more to adjust for the captured water.


    Anyway, I like the color better, and it seems to solarize less, and it may have some hygroscopic properties that make it partially print out, which could be used to adjust image tone and contrast as well. I'm not doing that, but I believe an advanced user could use that to good effect.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  10. #20
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    I'm using the ammonium version as well. I may switch to this totally as soon as I work through my stash of lithium palladium salt. Agree with all of Michael's observations about its qualities.
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


    http://www.clayharmon.net - turnip extraordinaire

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