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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by DirkDynamo
    hate to say it chainsaw....

    but that kind of sounds lame.
    Well I am not here for any artistic support or condemnation. As my original post stated I am simply seeking a confirmation of my methodology in creating a desired look. This style has been decided upon after three months in pre-production, endless artistic delineations with the Director, Production Designer, Producer and Band, multiple conversations and meetings with my film lab, questions and calls with my Kodak film rep and ASC members, and meetings with post-production/FX specialists.

    Our production design, sets, wardrobe, make-up, camera filtration, film stock(s), film processing, et al, have all been designed and chosen for a specific intent. That of providing the required look for this particular project. My original question was a fairly simple one, what I choose to do with the answer is of my own concern.

  2. #12
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I don't believe heating it with steam and then rapidly cooling and drying it will achieve the effect you desire.

    I would be more tempted to play with a short piece of film after processing and immerse it in a hot, slightly caustic bath followed by a cold slightly acidic bath. then wash.

    Good Luck! Experimentation is always both interesting and dangerous.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  3. #13
    agGNOME's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel
    I don't believe heating it with steam and then rapidly cooling and drying it will achieve the effect you desire.

    I would be more tempted to play with a short piece of film after processing and immerse it in a hot, slightly caustic bath followed by a cold slightly acidic bath. then wash.

    Good Luck! Experimentation is always both interesting and dangerous.
    I was thinking along the same lines. I think it will be very difficult to achieve reticulation without liquid immersion. I also think an attempt would be easier, and best saved for after the processing.

  4. #14

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    alternative methods for reticulation

    For what its worth, my experience in reticulation was during the late 1980's and I tried extreme methods, alternating between boiling water and ice cold water (with ice!!), 2 or 3 times over ... this was with exposed film. The best outcome I ever achieved was only very mild reticulation, in fact hardly noticeable. Then I read somewhere that most modern films (this was about 1990) are manufactured to guard against reticulation!

  5. #15
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chainsaw
    Out of extreme and warranted curiosity, is it possible to induce reticulation in a negative before it is processed?

    E.g., if a negative is heated and then rapidly cooled (or the reverse) will this yield a reticulated grain structure? And if so is it comparable to the temperature variances found in the processing method?
    Shouldn't this thread be in film processing instead of alt processing?
    Don Bryant

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