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  1. #1
    photo8x10's Avatar
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    Carbon Information

    Hello everyone,

    I'm reading the Sandy King's book, and I Think it's amazing book to learn this print technique. I've never print in carbon and my next step will be to start it.
    Now I have some questions:

    1) I'm looking for gelatine in Italy and I don't find it, so in Internet I've foind only 250 bloom gelatin, If I understand well this number is the hardener of it higher number is more water it can be absorb. In his book Sandy explain lots of formula with 175 blooms gelatin, What difference in term of measure(percentage or weight in formula)?

    2) About a pigment, I would like to do monochrome print, and not with strange colours(now I'm not interested in them), I would like to use black pigment. What are your advices? From Artcraft chemicals(where I usually buy my chemicals) in list there is black Lamp, I Think it is a pigment, is anyone use it? and if yes Are good to print in carbon?

    Thanks for your reply, and your advices.

    Best

    Stefano
    Digital is Slow..........Analog is ROCK!!!!

    Visit me at http://www.stefanogermi.com
    Visit My Portfolio in Apug

  2. #2
    John Jarosz's Avatar
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    Sandy's book has a lot of info and is a fine book on the subject. I have learned a lot from it.

    I've made many carbons, but I have not made my own carbon tissue. I started many years ago with Haefenstengel material (not made anymore). I have good success with carbon tissue made by Bostick & Sullivan
    http://www.bostick-sullivan.com/

    The reason I recommend purchasing carbon tissue is that the carbon process is difficult enough for newbies without also having to make their own tissue. If you use some commercial tissue and get experience with it, making your own tissue can be a "second step" in learning the processes. Bostick & Sullivan has very detailed instructions on the use of their tissue that will enable you to have good success the first time.

    This is my opinion of course, but I feel it will help you to make prints the first tiome you try.

    John

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by photo8x10
    Hello everyone,

    I'm reading the Sandy King's book, and I Think it's amazing book to learn this print technique. I've never print in carbon and my next step will be to start it.
    Now I have some questions:

    1) I'm looking for gelatine in Italy and I don't find it, so in Internet I've foind only 250 bloom gelatin, If I understand well this number is the hardener of it higher number is more water it can be absorb. In his book Sandy explain lots of formula with 175 blooms gelatin, What difference in term of measure(percentage or weight in formula)?

    2) About a pigment, I would like to do monochrome print, and not with strange colours(now I'm not interested in them), I would like to use black pigment. What are your advices? From Artcraft chemicals(where I usually buy my chemicals) in list there is black Lamp, I Think it is a pigment, is anyone use it? and if yes Are good to print in carbon?

    Thanks for your reply, and your advices.

    Best

    Stefano

    Stefano,

    About the gelatins, I use both 250 and 175 Bloom gelatin. Basically, the higher Bloom the gelatin the less you need to use per liter. So, an 8% solution of 250 Bloom gelatin has about the same viscosity as a 10% solutoin of 175 Bloom or a 15% solution of 100 Bloom. Both will work but have different setting characteristics.

    As for pigments, a good monochrome pigment is lampblack in tube watercolor. You can also use other pigment in liquid dispersion forms, such as those meant for mixing in the industrial paint trade. I do not recommend powder pigments as it is time consuming to grind them.

    Best,

    Sandy

  4. #4
    photo8x10's Avatar
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    As for pigments, a good monochrome pigment is lampblack in tube watercolor. You can also use other pigment in liquid dispersion forms, such as those meant for mixing in the industrial paint trade. I do not recommend powder pigments as it is time consuming to grind them.
    Sandy,

    Could you give me a good dealer where I could buy a pigments? And in your experience what's the better kind or brand of pigments?

    Best

    Stefano
    Digital is Slow..........Analog is ROCK!!!!

    Visit me at http://www.stefanogermi.com
    Visit My Portfolio in Apug

  5. #5

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    Stefano, you could try Ditta Dolci (http://www.dolcicolor.it/index.html). They are in Verona, probably not far from where you are. They have earths, iron oxides, aqueous dispersions and such, in case you really want to prepare your own tissue from powder pigments. Or else, try Maimeri water colors in tube. Maimeri is good and it is italian, so you will find their products easily in art shops. I think that their water color line is called MaimeriBlu.

    Ciao
    Tom Sobota
    Madrid, Spain
    Tom Sobota

  6. #6
    photo8x10's Avatar
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    Thanks Tom,

    I'm watching the dolci's site, and I've found somethings interesting.

    Best

    Stefano
    Digital is Slow..........Analog is ROCK!!!!

    Visit me at http://www.stefanogermi.com
    Visit My Portfolio in Apug

  7. #7

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    Fine. Here is also the pointer to Maimeri, in case you want to use dry pigments:
    http://www.maimeri.it/Generale/colorprod.asp?mnu=0503

    Cheers
    Tom
    Tom Sobota

  8. #8
    photo8x10's Avatar
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    Great!!!!!

    A Good Dealer is near my home......

    Best

    Stefano
    Digital is Slow..........Analog is ROCK!!!!

    Visit me at http://www.stefanogermi.com
    Visit My Portfolio in Apug

  9. #9
    photo8x10's Avatar
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    Hi

    today I tried to make my carbon tissue, a little amount, and for my first experience I used a food gelatine and a Maimeri watercolour.

    I did 500 ml of solution, I used 40 gr of gelatine(I don't know bloom) and 10 gr of watercolour(more and less half of 15ml tube)

    I followed the Sandy King's book, and I think I did a "good" job.
    I tried also to cot it in a paper with terrible result, only 3 sheets are almost good.

    I would like to know if the amount of watercolour I used is a good point of start? Because I 'm not sure it's the right amount.
    And what's the best method to coat my sheets? I did it without a square.

    Best

    Stefano
    Digital is Slow..........Analog is ROCK!!!!

    Visit me at http://www.stefanogermi.com
    Visit My Portfolio in Apug

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by photo8x10
    Hi

    today I tried to make my carbon tissue, a little amount, and for my first experience I used a food gelatine and a Maimeri watercolour.

    I did 500 ml of solution, I used 40 gr of gelatine(I don't know bloom) and 10 gr of watercolour(more and less half of 15ml tube)

    I followed the Sandy King's book, and I think I did a "good" job.
    I tried also to cot it in a paper with terrible result, only 3 sheets are almost good.

    I would like to know if the amount of watercolour I used is a good point of start? Because I 'm not sure it's the right amount.
    And what's the best method to coat my sheets? I did it without a square.

    Best

    Stefano

    Hi Stefano,

    Describe exactly how you coated and the problems you encountered. Include the following if you can remember or wrote it down. 1) room temperature and humidity, 2) temperature of glop when you poured it on the paper, 3) how much glop you poured for a given print size, and 4) how did you spread the glop to the edges of the paper. Did you use a frame? And, did you remember to level the coating surface?


    The amount of watercolor pigment you used sounds about right to me.

    Sandy

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