Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,338   Posts: 1,537,675   Online: 947
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    13
    Images
    1

    Tips for brush-coating sensitizers?

    Obviously it takes some practice, some skill, and trial-and-error.

    Any helpful tips?

  2. #2
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Cary, North Carolina
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    809
    Richeson 9010 series brushes are by far the best. Watch how many people agree with me.

    Make sure the paper is humidifed prior to coating. There are a number of ways to do this. A corollary is to make sure that your coating area is fairly humid.

    Ice Tea makes a wonderful practice liquid.

    First Post? Welcome to APUG.
    Two New Projects! Light on China - 07/13/2014

    www.joelipkaphoto.com

    250+ posts and still blogging! "Postcards from the Creative Journey"

    http://blog.joelipkaphoto.com/

  3. #3
    billschwab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Meeshagin
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,748
    Images
    52
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka
    Richeson 9010 series brushes are by far the best. Watch how many people agree with me.
    Count me as one. I tried going on the cheap for awhile... rods, imitation synthetic brushes, etc. Finally dropped the $$ for the Richeson and haven't looked back. I use so much less sensitizer now as virtually nothing is absorbed into the brush. Go for it.

    Bill

  4. #4
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,326
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    438
    hear hear... the Richeson is about the smoothest, most efficient coating brush you can find. I can do an 8x10 pt/pd print with just 15 drops pt/pd and 15 sensitizer with a Richeson, on COT 320. Over the course of two bottles of pt/pd, you'll pay for the brush in chem savings.

  5. #5
    colrehogan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Shooter
    Large Format Pan
    Posts
    2,016
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    16
    I agree too.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    13
    Images
    1
    I've heard about those brushes
    Why do you think humidity helps with the coating?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka
    Richeson 9010 series brushes are by far the best. Watch how many people agree with me.

    Make sure the paper is humidifed prior to coating. There are a number of ways to do this. A corollary is to make sure that your coating area is fairly humid.

    Ice Tea makes a wonderful practice liquid.

    First Post? Welcome to APUG.

  7. #7
    colrehogan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Shooter
    Large Format Pan
    Posts
    2,016
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    16
    It helps the paper absorb the chemicals better and probably helps in getting an even application. I've tried coating down to 32% rel. humidity during the winter and my prints didn't work well below 35% (even with humidification). This is what I think, not necessarily what is the right answer to your question.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    868
    Images
    24
    Humidity helps the paper to absorb the coating in an even, consistant manner. The analogy is to a sponge. If you take a dried out sponge from under the sink, it will not absorb much water. If you wet it and then wring it out, it absorbs more.

    I have a hard time printing pt. in the winter when the humidity in my dark room hits 20 to 30 percent. The emulsion just lays on top of the paper and gets pushed around. When that happens, I boil some water to up the humidity in the room and then I hold the paper over a humidifier for a few seconds--both front and back.

  9. #9
    John_Brewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    454
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka
    Richeson 9010 series brushes are by far the best. Watch how many people agree with me.
    Ah, the Magic brush. A must have.

    J
    ~John~
    --------------------------
    www.johnbrewerphotography.com
    There are 10 types of people in this world - those who understand binary and those who don't.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    State College, PA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka
    Richeson 9010 series brushes are by far the best.
    Nope, I would not characterize the Richeson as 'by far the best', except if you are comparing it to only a Hake or rod. There are other very good synthetic wash brushes out there that work equally well, and to some people are superior.

    The only one other than the 9010 that I have experience with is the Simmons Skywash brush, but it does an equally good job. It takes a little different method, but otherwise is at least the equal to the 9010 in terms of coating quality.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin