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  1. #11
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner
    Have you tried dual printing with a Pyrocat neg? I'm curious because in some respects Pyrocat is an easier developer for me to work with.
    Yes I have dual printed with negatives developed in Pyro, though a few caveats are in order.

    As Sandy King pointed out recently, if you are making negatives for grade 2 AZO then they will be too contrasty for palladium printing.

    For enlarged negatives you can of course adjust contrast by using a VC paper or possibly using a soft grade of graded paper. Unfortunately we don't have the range of graded papers we once had so your options may be limited there unless you resort to a two developer bath. FWIW, I rarely enlarge prints now.

    At one time though I used PMK almost exclusively for enlarging and was generally pleased with the results.
    Don Bryant

  2. #12
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
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    TMAX 100 should be avoided. It does a dandy job of blocking UV light.
    Two New Projects! Light on China - 07/13/2014

    www.joelipkaphoto.com

    250+ posts and still blogging! "Postcards from the Creative Journey"

    http://blog.joelipkaphoto.com/

  3. #13

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    Hi Lachlan,
    I've had a lot of luck with Tri-X in D76, seems to work for me.
    BTW, I'm originally from Crieff, I've spent many an hour in Blairgowrie!
    Best,
    Rory

  4. #14
    Kerik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    So what is your solution for avoiding un-needed stain with PMK? I know that the after fix developer soak creates useless stain with PMK. And I don't normally associate Rollo-Pyro with PMK even though they are similar developers, hence my comments were not directed toward Rollo-Pyro developed films.

    FWIW, I've been very happy with Pyro-Cat for several years but I agree with what you often say, "If it ain't broke ..."
    I group them together because I get very similar staining from PMK and Rollo, which isn't surprising since the formulas are similar. The benefit of Rollo for me is shorter development times and less base fog on films like Bergger/Forte and the older HP5+. The afterbath is definitely a no-no. I did a quick side-by-side test with Rollo and Pyrocat several months ago using FP4. My very unscientific test showed me that I much preferred the prints from the Rollo negs, so the "If it ain't broke ..." rule kicked in.
    Kerik Kouklis
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  5. #15

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    Sandy's advice is sage in this area. He has lots of experience. Just an idea, though: EFKE 25 has fairly high contrast and the kind of tonality that may work very well with platinum.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth
    Sandy's advice is sage in this area. He has lots of experience. Just an idea, though: EFKE 25 has fairly high contrast and the kind of tonality that may work very well with platinum.
    Although I have never used EFKE 25 I suspect tht it woud be a great film for Pt./Pd. if you can live with the slow ASA. I have seen some outstanding work with EFKE 50 in 4X5 size with PMK (by Tim - Noseoil) and the image qualities were outstanding. However, even ASA 50 presents many problems for field work with LF cameras.

    One thing to remember is that the match between the film curve and the negative curve is extremely important in determing the best film match for the Pt./Pd. process. And if you want to learn from the best, get a copy of Dick Arentz's second edition on Platinum and Palladium Printing (or sign up for a workshp with him). Arentz is the most accomplished Pt./Pd. printer in the world today, and brings to his work not only a mastery of sensitometry, but also a good synergism between precision in-camera work and digital negatives.

    Arentz prefers TRI-X 320 for his in-camera negatives, and non-staining developers. If you read his book, look at the sensitometry, and most importantly his prints, you will see that Tri-X is a very good film for Pt./Pd. printing, even though it lacks the expansion potential of the films that I personally prefer, FP4+ and TMY.

    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 07-05-2006 at 06:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    Lachlan Young's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    Although I have never used EFKE 25 I suspect tht it woud be a great film for Pt./Pd. if you can live with the slow ASA. I have seen some outstanding work with EFKE 50 in 4X5 size with PMK (by Tim - Noseoil) and the image qualities were outstanding. However, even ASA 50 presents many problems for field work with LF cameras.

    One thing to remember is that the match between the film curve and the negative curve is extremely important in determing the best film match for the Pt./Pd. process. And if you want to learn from the best, get a copy of Dick Arentz's second edition on Platinum and Palladium Printing (or sign up for a workshp with him). Arentz is without question (and by far IMHO) the most accomplished Pt./Pd. printer in the world today, and brings to his work not only a mastery of sensitometry, but also a wonderfu synergism of traditional in-camera work and digital negatives.

    Arentz prefers TRI-X 320 for his in-camera negatives, and non-staining developers. If you read his book, look at the sensitometry, and most importantly his prints, you will understand why this works so well for him.

    Sandy
    Wolfgang Moersch according to his website leads workshops on Platinum printing as well as making a range of specialized developers including Tanol. I probably should email him and ask for his opinion about development times.

    As to the ADOX/Efke 25 or 50 I have been leaning towards these for my LF work as I like their tonal response. What are their reciprocity characteristics like? Also, is Fuji Acros any good for alt printing or not? I know it has good reciprocity characteristics but am unsure if it has any major downsides with regard to UV transmission.

    All help much appreciated,

    LAchlan

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lachlan Young
    Wolfgang Moersch according to his website leads workshops on Platinum printing as well as making a range of specialized developers including Tanol. I probably should email him and ask for his opinion about development times.

    As to the ADOX/Efke 25 or 50 I have been leaning towards these for my LF work as I like their tonal response. What are their reciprocity characteristics like? Also, is Fuji Acros any good for alt printing or not? I know it has good reciprocity characteristics but am unsure if it has any major downsides with regard to UV transmission.

    All help much appreciated,

    LAchlan

    Frankly I would not be too concerned about developer for Pt./Pd. printing. Since you are working with 4X5 you don't need to be as concerned about sharpness and grain as when silver printing with 35mm and roll film negatives. And in Pt./Pd. printing density, whether from silver or stain, is just density, so assuming you get enough contrast from your film/developer combination, and assuming your negatives are not too dense, say from overexpoosure or lots of general stain, it really does not make a lot of difference whether you use a staining or non-staining developer. In the end film choice is far more important than developer choice.

    I don't know anything about the reciprocity characteristics of Efke 25. However, it is an old film and I would assume that it is going to have a lot of reciprocity failure. Across, on the other hand, has outstanding reciprocity characteristics, so good in fact that in low light conditions your exposures with it may well be much shorter than if shooting with an ASA 400 film.

    Sandy

  9. #19
    RobertP's Avatar
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    I'm surprised there's been no mention of JandC 400

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertP
    I'm surprised there's been no mention of JandC 400
    JandC 400 is a good film, but it does not have as much potential for expansion develoment as the others I mentioned which may limit it to normal and high contrast scenes. I rate it more or less on par with HP5+.

    Sandy

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