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  1. #11
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    just another qs.

    should i use whatman filter paper (grade 1) to separate the solution after putting the chemicals together?

    I now used a (brown) coffee filter, which probably contains some kind of chemicals.... Or is it save to use these.

  2. #12
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    Hi guys, have just started producing some cyanotypes, using the new process (cyanotype II) see gallery. I think i need to find some new paper to either that or treat the paper before putting the sensistiser as it does turn green after i have let it dry (how do you treat the paper?). Am currently using Fabriano Rosapina (60%cotton), have tried Fabriano 5 and Artistico with them both also turning green after sensitiser is applied.
    I dont know if this is effecting the final results as i have just started using the process. What actual effect does having the wrong paper have when using cyanotype II? does it fog the highlights?
    Also how much is that Buxton paper?

    Thanks for any help

  3. #13

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    Am I wrong or does this Bergger paper hold a photographic emulsion used for printing-out?
    I never tried to use a coffee-filter. I also do not use the Watman, but some german equivalent. I am not sure abotu the exact grade, but my filters are denser than a coffee filter. Such filters are inexpensive, and I suggest using them, as this just eliminates a worry.

    The source for Buxton is: http://www.ruscombepaper.com/

    There is a price list, one large sheet is something like 8-9 Euro. That is an arm and a leg, but I just tested it, and am about to order a larger quantity, exclusively for New Cyanotype, as this seems to b the only paper which really reliably works, and this saves a lot of frustration. (I have also recently been in conversation about this with Mike Ware, who invented the New Cyanotype process and according to whose specifications this paper is made. I recommend studying his website!)

    I love the New Cyanotype process, but it is very different to handle from traditional cyanotypes.

    To prepare Fabriano, bathe in 1% hydrochloric, water to get the acid out, dry.

  4. #14
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukas Werth
    ...
    I love the New Cyanotype process, but it is very different to handle from traditional cyanotypes. ...
    I've only done the "traditional cyanotype" so far, and have a little problem with seeing how it could be improved enough to make it worthwhile. Especially since it uses proprietary chemicals, is very sensitive to paper, and the originator recommends the addition of a known carcinogenic (dichromate) for contrast control.

    Anyone care to enlighten me?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #15

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    I don't know what "proprietory chemicals" are, and dichromates are used in 1001 alternative processes, in much larger quantities. This is not to say that I want to argue for or against New Cyanotypes or the traditional process, I use both. So the following is a personal opinion, about a personal approach to create photographic art:

    New cyanotypes can give a tonal range second to no other process, like the best platin or salt prints, and the process can, in difference to traditional c., be used for the same long-scale negs. The darkest blue is very nearly black, and the visual contrast is, if executed the right way, soft and wonderful. If you don't like the blues, that is the end of it, but if you do for some of your images, as I do, the difficulties, and the expensive paper may well be worth it (particularly as the sensitizer itself is very cheap).

  6. #16
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukas Werth
    Am I wrong or does this Bergger paper hold a photographic emulsion used for printing-out?
    It is used a lot for palladium/platina.

    http://www.bostick-sullivan.com/main/bergger.htm
    "This is a 100% cotton paper designed for hand coated alternative process work. Originally designed as the fiber base for Bergger's highly acclaimed Silver Supreme enlarging paper, this uncoated version has a sumptuous quality and excellent sizing which making hand coating easy and consistent. This paper is 320gm per square meter weight (120lb stock in US measurements), a bright white surface with just a touch of warmth, and a smooth texture with a little 'tooth'. Easy to work with for larger prints and no watermark to interfere with your image. A top quality paper for platinum and palladium printing. "

  7. #17
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    Lukas, thanks for sheding some light on my problems with the Cyanotype II process. Do you (or anyone else!)have other recommendations for paper? I'm having a hard time locating a source for Buxton paper in the US. Right now, I have COT320, Arches Platine, and Cranes cover that I use for other processes.

    Thanks -- Mark

  8. #18

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    Mark,
    I remember once having noted in an email conversation that there appears to be a source in New York for Buxton, but I think you may also order it directly from the maker in France.
    Let me just note that I feel somwwhat awkward writing these lines, as I don't want to appear promoting a particular paper or brand in some way. This runs totally against my grain in photography.Also, my personal experience with Buxton is, as I mentioned, only very recent and limited. But I have heard only the best about the performance of this paper by the most reliable sources I know.

    Cranes paper is not easily available in Europe, so I have no experience of it. Those sorts commonly used by platinum printers might work, one has to try (there is one "parchment wove" or similar, and one "kid finish")
    Whatman watercolour is also alkali-free, but the performance with New C in my experience is similarly unreliable as with Arches Platine. That is, I have made good prints on these papers, but run into trouble at other times. (I have some suspicions for possible reasons, but these I don't want to write here, because they are completely unproven)

    Willie Jan, thanks for information about the Bergger paper. I know see why it comes in "photographic" sizes. Does the sensitizer stay yellow on this paper, or does it turn green also?

  9. #19
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukas Werth
    Willie Jan, thanks for information about the Bergger paper. I know see why it comes in "photographic" sizes. Does the sensitizer stay yellow on this paper, or does it turn green also?
    I am not sure. It looked a little green to me, but i filtered it through a normal coffee filter, i do not know if this also could contaminate the liquid. I still have a little bit left and want to do some testing when it's not so hot anymore in my darkroom (+30 celcius). These temperatures do not often appear here.....

    yesterday i shot some infrared 4x5 in an old flower grow house (glass) where the nature took over. Swetting all over just for some negatives....

  10. #20

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    Willie Jan,

    Just to make shure: New c. sensitizer, as I know it, always looks somewhat greenish when out of the bottle, and if you look from above into the brown bottle, it may even have a bluish tinge. When coated onto the paper, however, the colour must be of a bright yellow, and this yellow colour must remain, and not turn into green. So my question is: when coated onto Bergger, presuming that it looks yellow at least at first, does it stay so or does it turn into green?

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