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  1. #21
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    ok everybody.

    Let's just all take a step back and cool off here; no need to get a flame war going over this.

    Ok, as to the e-mail addresses that PE has, i don't think that any of us would share them unless the people to whom said addresses belong allow it.

    And I'll share the info. if the people I get it from don't have a problem with it. I'll of course ask, but in the research of an old process like this one, it would be useless to keep the information to yourself.

    I brought it here because of hte greay group discussion that [usually] occurs here. I don't have the skills, time or money to completely research and tinker with everything my myself, which is why this is here.

    So, ANYWAY, I don't have much to share at this point, as there is not much that actually works yet. I have learned a few things, though.

  2. #22
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Things I know SO FAR:

    +Coating onto base material will be difficult.
    - Adhesive must be put onto surface FIRST, followed by starch, the two cannot be mixed beforehand
    - I've had good luck with epoxy. I mix it and place it onto a line across the top of the plate. I then spread it with a rod down the plate so it is even. This runs into issues as the epoxy begins to harden as it is spread. I am trying to see if I can thin it out with some type of solvent before spreading. Then, after it is spread evenly, I shake on the starch (these experiments were done with corn starch, so it may change with the potato sruff), and brush it over the plate so it covers most everything. I maje sure to press it hard so as to embed it into the glue. I then shake off the excess, brush it again, shake off the excess, until the plate is mostly dry. This results in a pretty good coat. however, corn starch tends to stick together, resulting in a slightly uneven coat.

    I'm going to try this with potato starch this weekend.

    As to the film, I've discovered that my 4x5 Fortepan ($12.00 / box @ B&H), has a back-coated anti-halo layer that comes off very easily with an alkaline solution. So I now have a film to use.

    I still am looking for a film with no anti-halo layer in either 120 or sheet sizes. i once again ask for any info. that anyone has ...

  3. #23
    Lachlan Young's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242
    I still am looking for a film with no anti-halo layer in either 120 or sheet sizes. i once again ask for any info. that anyone has ...
    I think Lucky pan 100 or 400 could be what you are looking for - try JandC

    Hope this helps,

    Lachlan

  4. #24
    DBP
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    It occurs to me that a flour sifter might help prevent clumping.

  5. #25
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Do the Lucky films lack an anti-halo layer?


    DPB, that flower sifter idea was mentioned in the past, though I'd forgotten about it. I'm going to give that a try this weekend and see if it helps me at all.

    Thanks for reminding me!!

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242
    And I'll share the info. if the people I get it from don't have a problem with it. I'll of course ask, but in the research of an old process like this one, it would be useless to keep the information to yourself.

    I brought it here because of hte greay group discussion that [usually] occurs here. I don't have the skills, time or money to completely research and tinker with everything my myself, which is why this is here.
    I didn't intend to make as issue about ANYTHING.

    I agree with you totally.

    Frank

  7. #27
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Oops, double post, read below ...

  8. #28
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    I've been looking around online and there seem to be some good suggestions for coating methods, which are very similar to what I used, so the actual starch coating I think is going ot be ok.

    However, I have two MAJOR questions, which i need to work on.

    1.) What kind of dyes are best? The food dyes do not really work, especially on potato starch.

    2.) How is the lampblack coated on? Of the whole process, the details on this are the most shaky. Everything says that a "special machine" was used for coating it.

    On the same note, is there an easy way to produce large quantities of lampblack?

  9. #29
    Lachlan Young's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242
    Do the Lucky films lack an anti-halo layer?
    Their anti-halo layer is widely regarded as largely ineffective or almost non-existant if that is what you are after.

    Hope this helps,

    Lachlan

  10. #30
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    Lampblack can be purchased commercially as a powder or as a pre-made dispersion in a material suitable for coating. This is used in carbon printing.

    Dyes are also available for carbon printing. If they are properly placed on starch grains, they would be appropriate dyes for the autochrome filter mask.

    PE

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