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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Pakistan
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    This is actually the second time I am keying in this answer: I saw the first one in the thread after submitting it, but somehow it disappeared. Curious.
    However: Just to be clear about one point: for the test you put a drop of fo into ferricyanide, not the other way round and if that turns blue, you know there is enough ferrous o inside not to print proberly. Mind you: this does not mean that there is only ferrous o, but just that there is some.

    I tend to think that what you got is actually ferric o, but maybe not of proper quality, or maybe it's gone somewhat bad because you heated it too extensively to get it into solution. If it was only ferrous o, you would get nothing into solution, try as you might, adding oxalic acid as much as you want.

    You will see that the fo from B&S will also take its time to dissolve, though you may certainly depend on its quality.

    I got my 35% peroxide from a chem supplier - not easy to find one here who sells to private persons. You may try also at a shop which sells chemicals for school experiments - that is my second source here. It is generally not easy to locate ingredients for alternative processes.

  2. #12

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    Apr 2006
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    Toronto, CANADA
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    Thanks again Lukas

    The only chem supplier that I know of in Canada (dealing with individuals) is JDPhotochem, so I'm trying to find the H202 elsewhere.

    I'm not sure what I have ever was in solution. The milky "solution" I referred to before could have simply been the ferrous suspended in the water after shaking (which is why it continually separated). Doing the potassium ferricyanide test with the unheated "solution" causes a rapid and intense color change to blue. After doing the steps you detailed, it is very much reduced. I have read from a few sources that the ferricyanide test can be done by adding it to the FO solution, so it looks like either method works. In my case, adding a few crystals of ferricyanide to a couple drops of FO was more convenient.

    thanks again for all your help. I have a working solution of FO now, and got to learn a few things. I'm writing out the equation now just so I have a note of it, I'll post in later tonight or tommorow.

    Later

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