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  1. #11
    Gene_Laughter's Avatar
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    I haven't seen your question, but once I did transfer a bromoil image onto an aluminum lithographic plate. This was done under the supervision of the head of the Printmaking Department of Virginia Commonwealth University, who prepared the aluminum plate for using on a litho press with scraper bar. I don't classify this as being experienced on my part! :>)

    Gene



    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH
    While this thread is hot....
    I posted a while back a question concerning bromoil on aluminium plates; to which I received no replies. My question is simple - does anyone have experience with this method ?

    Thanks !

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene_Laughter
    I would be most interested from a historic standpoint of the names of some of the artists who routinely produced full color bromoil transfer prints.

    Thanks and cheers!

    Gene
    Gene,

    The Spanish bromoil artist I am thinking of is Jose Maria Casal Ariet of Barcelona, who begin working with three-color bromoil around 1925 and practiced it until the late 1940s. Some of his three-color bromoil transfer prints were still hanging at the site of the Agrupacion Fotografica de Cataluna in 1987 when I was doing research on Pictorialism in Spain. Casal Ariet published a series of articles, in Spanish, on three-color printing with both carbro and bromoil in the bulleting of the Agrupacion Fotografica de Cataluna in the late late 1940s.

    My understanding is that a collection of bromoil prints by Casal Ariet is owned by the Funcacion Joan Miro, in Barcelona, but I have never seen any of these prints.

    I too was unaware of any significant commerical use of three-color bromoil in the USA. Wonder if PE was not thinking about three-color carbro?

    Sandy

  3. #13

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    Fascinating thread! I've not seen much about the use of color in bromoils, transfers or otherwise.

    Gene, thanks for posting that link - that is amazing work, indeed.

  4. #14

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    I've done quite a bit of bromoil in the past. I posted several images in the gallery. David Lewis is an excelent resource for information and materials. His bromoil paper is fairly easy to work with. The nicest paper i've worked on was the Agfa MC matte. Too bad to see it go.

    Transfer involves inking up an image and transfering it by running it through a press. I've never tried this, although I have had a very nice gravure press now for a couple of years. Given the work involved in inking up a bromoil, I have been hesitant to risk transfer all that hard work.
    Don Sigl
    www.drs-fineartphoto.com

  5. #15
    Gene_Laughter's Avatar
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    Sandy, thanks for the interesting info about the bromoil work of Jose Maria Casal Ariet. I'm fairly knowledgable about the history of Bromoil in the U.K., Belgium, Russia and the U.S.A. Spain is a different story, however. I know nothing about any of the bromoilists there - past or present.

    Cheers,

    Gene

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene_Laughter
    Sandy, thanks for the interesting info about the bromoil work of Jose Maria Casal Ariet. I'm fairly knowledgable about the history of Bromoil in the U.K., Belgium, Russia and the U.S.A. Spain is a different story, however. I know nothing about any of the bromoilists there - past or present.

    Cheers,

    Gene
    Gene,

    One of the interesting facts about Spain is that it was economiclaly isolated from the rest of Europe from the end of the Spanish Civil War until the early 1950s when the US signed a series of treaties that allowed air force and military bases on Spanish soil. One of the results of the isolation was that there was virtually no way to buy photograhic supplies so many of the photographers there continued tio use old processes like gum, bromoil, etc. at a time when the use of these processes had disappaeared as mainstream processes in the rest of the world.

    One of the greatest bromoil artists of all time IMO was the Catalan Joaquim Pla Janini, who died in 1979 as I recall. In his studio in Barcelona that looks out on the main cathedral of Barcelona in the old part of the city he made hundreds of technically perfect bromoil prints, including a very large number of transfers in sizes up to 16X20 or so. Fundacio La Caixa published a book of his work in 1995, the title being simply Joaquim Pla Janini. Not sure if this book is avaiable by loan in the US, but in case it is the ISBN is 84-7664-531-7. Also, I believe you know that I wrote the text of a book published in 2000 by the Ministry of Culture of Galicia on another bromoil photographer, Schmidt de las Heras. In fact, I own a very fine bromoil print by Schmidt, which was given to me by the present owner of the Schmidt collection, Jose Carruncho, a fine photographer in his own right.

    I have personally never made a bromoil print, but in my research on Schmidt I learned a lot about how it is done, and have a great appreciation for the beauty and flexibility of the process.

    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 07-26-2006 at 10:50 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene_Laughter
    Done routinely? That's certainly news to me!!!

    Gene
    Gene;

    In their textbook "Making Color Prints" by Leadly and Stegmeyer, they devote a full chapter to Tricolor Bromoil Printing, (Ch IX). They list sources of individual color inks and complete kits, but then refer back to the similarities to other tanning and transfer processes, so the chapter is short.

    It then refers the readers to the book by Dr. Emil Mayer, "Bromoil".

    These books were published before the middle of the last century, and the L&S book outlines many color print processes.

    I think that Sandy King's comments about use in Spain are to the point as well. I have seen many fine color Bromoil prints. If you get to Rochester, maybe we can see if GEH has any in their collection that we can view. I've really never checked it out. We might find some really old ones there.

    PE

  8. #18
    Gene_Laughter's Avatar
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    PE - I have both of the books to which you refer. The little "Making Color Prints" book is here on my desk now. I just reread the tiny chapter on tricolor bromoil printing. It's still my opinion that full or tricolor transfers were produced in the "good ol" days on an infrequent basis by a very few and not routinely by large numbers of bromoilists. Compared to traditional bromoil, tri-color bromoil was somewhat of a mechanical process: inking film matriices by a roller, not a brush. The color process had few of the controls that bromoil was known for and few ways to express artistic creativity. The tricolor inks sold were not only used by those producing full color prints, but by those doing color layering from one unseparated negative. I use them now - except they are vintage inks from Drem in Austria and Sinclair in London, not Partington (misspelled "Parkington" in the book). Some of the monochrome transfer artists, Robert Desme as an example, used film for the matrix also, which made multiple transfer a snap when it came to registration. Alas, Agfa up and changed the emulsion formula of the film in the early 70's I believe it was, and then only photo paper could be used, and, of course, when the paper matrix was soaked in water one experienced the shrink/swell factor and registration became much more difficult. Desme gave up transfer at this point as did some others. I have long studied the history of bromoil to the extent that I could find information. I would be very interested in the names of any photo artists in the USA who produced tricolor or full color bromoil prints. I know many produced these in carbro and carbon. The only tricolor bromoils that I have come across were commercial photo illustrators. One reason, perhaps, is that the old one shot 3 color cameras were both heavy and expensive and most bromoilists were amateurs and artists. And - there were a number of other processes that could produce full color prints easier and better than bromoil! Dr. Emil Mayer's book, "Bromoil Printing and Transfer," only makes a two paragraph mention of making a full color transfers from separated negatives, saying that it is extremely difficult and requires a complete mastery of the process. Mayer elaborates on polychrome transfers, but these were like I now work, from one unseparated negative and utilizing various colors of ink. Mayer himself was a master of transfer, but only produced monochrome prints. Or, at least, no color prints of his have ever been found.

    PE, this has been a most interesting discussion!

    Cheers,

    Gene

  9. #19
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    Gene;

    You are entirely correct. My comment was misleading and ambiguous.

    I should have said that bromoil represented a fair portion of the color prints made in the early days of color printing. This was split among the many processes extant at that time including carbro, bromoil, dye transfer and other similar methods.

    Does this seem a more reasonable asessment?

    Even Kodak Dye Transfer experts like Louie Condax were impressed by Bromoil and Carbro color prints. I have had the opportunity to discuss this and many other subjects on the early days of color printing with him personally, but of course, he preferred dye transfer. This was long ago and far away though.

    Louie and Charlie Edens, the father of Type "C" often got together in our office to debate the merits of 3 color transfer processes and tripacks like type "C". I have often wished I could make a 3 color Bromoil. Charlie encouraged me to make some dye transfers, but I always felt that my results were quite mediocre to say the least. I never tried a Bromoil.

    I do believe that a 3 color Bromoil using a brush can be made and would be very beautiful. I'm sure that the ones I saw were all done by using a roller. My print collection includes quite a few dye transfers but no bromoils.

    PE

  10. #20
    Gene_Laughter's Avatar
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    PE - A friend of mine, Chuck Kimball, in California, produces 3 and 4 color bromoil transfers. Chucks work is more painterly than what we refer to as "full color" transfers and have a look of autochrome or fresson. Chuck uses a roller or a brush - ot both. Check this out:

    http://www.artistsloft.com/bromoil/source/53.htm

    Cheers,

    Gene

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