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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene_Laughter
    PE - A friend of mine, Chuck Kimball, in California, produces 3 and 4 color bromoil transfers. Chucks work is more painterly than what we refer to as "full color" transfers and have a look of autochrome or fresson. Chuck uses a roller or a brush - ot both. Check this out:

    http://www.artistsloft.com/bromoil/source/53.htm

    Cheers,

    Gene
    Thanks.

    That is beautiful.

    PE

  2. #22
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    PE - In rethinking the question of tri-color bromoil transfers in the "good ol' days," I think the bottom line is there were more doing it than I thought and fewer doing it than you thought - maybe somewhere in the middle? :>)

    Cheers,

    Gene

  3. #23

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    I have to say, this is a fascinating thread. Folks reading it should understand the high level of experience and knowledge of participants like PE and Gene Laughter. Fellows, it just don't get much better than this when talkig abou historical processes.

    To both of you, if possible I would like to put aside some time this year, or next, to visit with you. Gene, that could be in Myrtle Beach, just down the road from where I live. Ron, you are farther away but hope we can find a time to vist as well.

    Thanks to both of you for sharing your knowledge and expertise withi this forum.

    Best,

    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 07-28-2006 at 11:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    I have to say, this is a fascinating thread. Folks reading it should understand the high level of experience, expetise and knowledge of participants like PE and Gene Laughter. Fellows, it just don't get much better than this.

    To both of you, if possible I would like to put aside some time this year, or next, to visit with you. Gene, that could be in Myrtle Beach, just down the road from where I live. Ron, you are farther away but hope we can find a time to vist as well.

    Thanks to both of you for sharing your knowledge and expertise withi this forum.

    Best,

    Sandy
    Thanks, Sandy. Unfortunately the history of bromoil is sketchy at best. This thread has made me reflect, think and ... do some educated guessing! It has been fun and I have about exhausted what little knowledge that I have on this subject! :>)

    Cheers,

    Gene

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene_Laughter
    Thanks, Sandy. Unfortunately the history of bromoil is sketchy at best. This thread has made me reflect, think and ... do some educated guessing! It has been fun and I have about exhausted what little knowledge that I have on this subject! :>)

    Cheers,

    Gene
    Gene;

    The history of emulsion making is sketchy as well, and often incorrect. I have been dealing with this enforced secrecy for years, but with bromoil it is quite a different story. I have a feeling that no one cared enough for some reason, to document it well. I suspect you are right, that the true figure is somewhere in between. I bought that book in about 1950, and always thought that bromoil was quite popular in the early part of the century for color printing. It was part of what I was 'told' by several older photographers.

    Next time I go over to GEH for lunch, I will try to get more information and perhaps do some digging into their archives. I have access to the EK library as well which might contain something.

    Sandy;

    I have several very good pictures of you and the both of us at the Formulary last month (analog not digital of course). I wish you well and regarding comments here, I hope that you and Gene and I can get together sometime for any reason at all, especially to toast the past and the future of conventional photography.

    Warmest regards.

    PE

  6. #26
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    PE and Sandy, Sometimes these discussions wander down side roads and take on a life of their own. With that in mind, I'm going to return to Dr. Emil Mayer, author of "Bromoil Printing and Transfer," which was referenced in the little book, "Making Color Prints." In case you aren't familar with Emil Mayer, here's the story in a nutshell. He was formerly a lawyer and lived in Austria. Mayer was pehaps the most knowledgable person alive in his day about bromoil and transfer. He gave up his law practice and formed the Drem Company, specializing in bromoil supplies and photographic gadgets. He had a light meter of sorts that was a popular item in the 1930's. Mayer was a gifted street photographer and knew bromoil and transfer backwards and forwards. He taught bromoil and transfer at a school that he set up there. Hugo Rudinger was one of assistants in teaching bromoil. Hugo left Austria for New York when things got too hot at the outbreak of WWII. Emil Mayer hung on, hoping for the best. One day the gestapo came to the Mayer household, rumaged through his house and destroyed all of his bromoil prints. Mayer and his wife were Jewish. The next day Emil and his wife committed suicide. By then Rudinger was in the USA. Many decades passed and Edward Rosser, a professor at Harvard, came across a portfolio of bromoil transfers by a "Dr. Emil Mayer" that Mayer had given to a neice. Rosser purchased the portfolio for a song. Rosser contacted me and asked what I knew about Emil Mayer, which wasn't much. I only knew that he had a successful photographic business, the Drem Company, and that he had written a couple of books on bromoil. Rosser kept digging for info and ended up writing a book on Mayer's tiny jewel-like transfers, "Viennese Types." If you don't have it, get it! Rosser donated the portfolio of transfers to Harvard University. A few years later I was contacted by a photo dealer asking if I would be interested in purchasing a number of Hugo Rudinger's (Mayer's assistant) bromoil transfers. The price was right and I bought them. I exhiited some of the Rudinger prints in "The Art of Bromoil Show" that I organized in Richmond last October. Then, from out of nowhere I got an email from Rudinger's granddaughter, who lives in California, and who had heard about the show. She said the fact that I was displaying Rudinger's work had made her mother extremely happy. The story had come full circle!

    Cheers,

    Gene

  7. #27

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    That is a great story!!

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene_Laughter
    PE - A friend of mine, Chuck Kimball, in California, produces 3 and 4 color bromoil transfers. Chucks work is more painterly than what we refer to as "full color" transfers and have a look of autochrome or fresson. Chuck uses a roller or a brush - ot both. Check this out:

    http://www.artistsloft.com/bromoil/source/53.htm

    Cheers,

    Gene
    I looked at these, and was struck by this: "...inked with dried and resoftened grumbacher oil paints..." I would not have thought this possible with regular oil paints! Amazing work!

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