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  1. #11
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    This makes a lot of sense to me for a workshop enviroment but in my own working conditions it would be a very big waste of energy to leave the tube bank on throughout a printing session. At 12 tubes X 40 watts each that turns out to be almost 500 watts, a fair amount of energy.

    Sandy
    At first glance, the number appears to be big. But when you put it into a context, you might arrive at a different conclusion.

    12 tubes at 40 watts = 480 watts
    Assuming an 8-hour working session, that becomes 3840 watt-hours, or 3.84 kilowatt-hours.
    Where I live, the local bandits (the utility) charge about 17 cents per kilowatt hour. So the energy cost for an 8-hour working session would be about 65.3 cents.

    The B&S combo kit sells for about $150 and is supposed to be enough to produce about 20 8x10s. An 8x10 sheet of COT320 costs about $1. So the materials that go into one 8x10 print (regardless of good or bad) cost about $8.50.

    Let's assume that you are really industrious and can produce 16 prints during that session. That means that the energy component of per-print cost associated with leaving the lights on throughout the session is about 4 cents.

    When you look at it this way, the energy cost doesn't seem so significant.
    Louie

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto
    When you look at it this way, the energy cost doesn't seem so significant.
    The energy costs are just part of the equation. Leaving the tube bank on creates additional heat, makes it difficult to use the roon for other purposes, say coating and dryng of exposed material, and would not allow use of my integrator system.

    From my perspective, the *only* advantage to leaving the lights on continually is bulb life. From the perspective of consistency in exposure there is no advantage at all since regular tubes reach full output within a few seconds of being turned on.

    However, in workshp enviroments where several people are using the same light it makes sense to me to just leave the exposing unit on all the time, assuming the room is not being used at the same time for coating and drying of light sensitive materials.

    Sandy

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by cperez
    Couple quick questions:

    - I understand the use of black light UV bulbs. Do standard fluorescent put out enough UV to be useful? Or just stick with blacklights (or specially made UV fluorescent sources)?

    ...
    Most standard fluorescent lamps, and especially the compact and spiral types, do not put out enough energy in the blue and UV region to be practical for alternative processes. I've been able to use tubes with a standard daylight phosphor (like FT20D, not the special color corrected "sunlight" phosphor) with a bit more than a stop in speed penalty over the BL phosphor for cyanotype. There are "high actinic" lamps from Phillips and others that look good on paper, but I haven't tried them. Blue phosphor bulbs (types like FT20B) work very well, but they are even more expensive than the BL bulbs and are harder to find.

  4. #14
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    On a somewhat related note, I have looked at the Iwasaki H125-BL screw-in light bulbs (125 and 160w E27), hoping they may be viable for printing 5x7/13x18. The link: http://www.specialtyoptical.com//cat...bl_2712672.htm. From what I can understand of the manufacturers information they are giving out UV in the 360 nm (and over) range which should be enough. (?)

    Even if they work, I still need to get a socket and cable to handle the 125 or 160w...
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerevan
    On a somewhat related note, I have looked at the Iwasaki H125-BL screw-in light bulbs (125 and 160w E27), hoping they may be viable for printing 5x7/13x18. The link: http://www.specialtyoptical.com//cat...bl_2712672.htm. From what I can understand of the manufacturers information they are giving out UV in the 360 nm (and over) range which should be enough. (?)

    Even if they work, I still need to get a socket and cable to handle the 125 or 160w...
    But these bulbs are not self-ballasted, are they? If not, you will need a fixture with correct ballast.

    Sandy

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerevan
    On a somewhat related note, I have looked at the Iwasaki H125-BL screw-in light bulbs (125 and 160w E27), hoping they may be viable for printing 5x7/13x18. The link: http://www.specialtyoptical.com//cat...bl_2712672.htm. From what I can understand of the manufacturers information they are giving out UV in the 360 nm (and over) range which should be enough. (?)

    Even if they work, I still need to get a socket and cable to handle the 125 or 160w...
    These lamps require the use of a ballast. I think making a light box out of a bank of 36W or 40W BLB tubes will give a much more even coverage of UV over the surface of the print in a smaller box than using a single (or a number of) 125W BLB mercury vapour lamp(s). Buying a handful of ordinary fluoro battens and replacing the tubes with BLB type tubes is simpler than messing about with lamp holders, ballasts, power factor capacitors etc. (at least, I'm planning to go down the path of using the tubes).

    John.

  7. #17
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    Thanks for the information - I managed to miss out on the Iwasaki bulbs needing HID ballast. I thought it was just a matter of finding a socket that could take the wattage. I also found them locally which was nice. You live and learn. Perseverance is the word of the day. One more go at it...
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  8. #18

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    Now that we know which bulbs to use, how about the construction of the box? A friend and I just went in on purchasing 6 bulbs at 27 watts each. We figure this will adequately cover 8x10 on an 11x14 sheet of paper.

    Are you guys building complete enclosed units? If so, how are you extracting the heat from the bulbs? Or is that a concern over a, say, 10min exposure?

    Or are you guys building your boxes with at least one side open? If so, what, if any, concerns do you have for UV light spillage?

  9. #19
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    I designed my box to be completely enclosed, with a hinged door that one lifts to insert the printing frame. I put a small muffin fan on one corner, and a light-tight vent on the opposite corner to deal with the heat problem - the fan draws air in and it flows out through the vent - but I've noticed that the positive pressure inside the box also forces the door open. Not a problem - just a curiosity.
    Louie

  10. #20

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    A muffin fan? Explain a little, if you could. Is that 10VDC? Or can it be rigged right up to 120VAC?

    Which kind of light tight vent were you able to find for your project? Special order item? Or Home Depot grade materials?

    Last thing, any issues in reversing the blower to reverse the airflow to "suck"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto
    I designed my box to be completely enclosed, with a hinged door that one lifts to insert the printing frame. I put a small muffin fan on one corner, and a light-tight vent on the opposite corner to deal with the heat problem - the fan draws air in and it flows out through the vent - but I've noticed that the positive pressure inside the box also forces the door open. Not a problem - just a curiosity.

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