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  1. #11
    clay's Avatar
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    That rule of thumb has worked well for me for most papers, even the very absorbent Rives BFK. I have made several 20x24's using this formula and gotten complete coating. I get a nice even and thoroughly coated print.

    I actually use less on some of the drafting vellums - typically 75% of the rule-of-thumb amount.

    Another factor to consider is the use of the appropriate size magic brush. I use a 4" brush for anything over 7x17, and since it is used wet, you are getting a little bit of an assist in even coating from the water retained in the bristles. But if you use this same rule of thumb for a small 6x9" print and happen to be using a 4" brush, you risk diluting the sensitizer too much. Which is why I keep different sizes of the Richeson brush on hand and pick the brush based on the size of the area I am coating.

    But as always, YMMV.

    Quote Originally Posted by bobherbst
    As others have already said, pipettes are the only way to go for prints larger than 8x10. As far as volume is concerned, Clay, I don't know how you get a complete and even coating with .1ml/10 sq in. unless you are coating on a very non-absorbent paper. I only coat with a brush (2" Windsor-Newton #606 Sceptre Gold) and use 3.5ml of both FeOx and Pt/Pd for a 12x20 print on Cranes Platinotype. It should be noted here that the paper you are using has a major impact on the amount of solution needed for an even coating. Fabriano Artistico and Opaline require significantly less volume of solution for coating due to more sizing in the paper than platinotype. Coating volume is paper dependent.
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


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  2. #12
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik
    My numbers are more in line with Clay's. I use 2.6 ml of ferric and pd for a 14x17 print (240 sq. in.) with a 4" Magic brush on Fabriano AEW, COT 320 and Rives BFK. I don't use p-type.
    Kerik, Is that 2.6ml total solution for a 14x17? If so are you double coating?

  3. #13
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Kerik, Now that I read this again it seems that it would be 5.2ml combined ferric and pd. Is that right? That is about what I use for an 8x20. Like Clay said YMMV. There are alot of variables involved from one persons way of coating to anothers. How well you are clearing the water from your brush may also have a lot to do with the difference in coating amounts. I guess the best advice for someone would be to find a method that works best for you and stick with it. As they say, " if its not broke...don't fix it. Just my humble opinion.

  4. #14
    Kerik's Avatar
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    Yes, a total volume of 5.2 ml (single coated) for a 14x17 or 12x20 print on any of the papers I use, except Vellums, which require considerably less per coat but work best double-coated.
    Kerik Kouklis
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  5. #15
    EricNeilsen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zebra
    Would be interested in hearing the ULF masters input on what drop count they felt appropriate for a 20 x 24 palladium print.

    I am using palladium only with FO # 1 and the Na2 method of contrast control. I am using a Richeson brush for the coating. On a related note is the NuArc 40 1Ks (not sure if I have the model number correct) my best option for even illumination or will the new unit Sandy has been testing be a viable option for prints this size. I currently use a 26 1Ks unit from NuArc, and there seems to be some light fall off on some of the negatives I am printing but oddly enough not all of the negatives. Just as likely could be operator error!

    Thanks in advance,

    Monty

    Monty, The pipettes are what I use for small prints, 11x14 and less. They are measured in .01 up to 2ml. I also have a set that holds 10ml with .1 measured lines. If I am doing a bunch of printing, I have burets set up that hold 50 ml of solution.

    I would work your drop count up on your smaller pieces and just go up based on that plus a little extra for the edges. The amounts that you have seen, between 4 and 6 should work for most papers, but so much depends on paper type and coating technique that you are in the best position to see.

    The first few times I made 20x24's I tried drop counts, but after a few interruptions and losing track, I suggested we switch to burets. Just make sure you get teflon stop cocks. It is important to avoid the iron clips so also get treaded valves.

    Ferric Oxalate goes in one and the other gets palladium. All the other additives can be added with the pipettes.

    Eric

  6. #16
    EricNeilsen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donsta
    B&S sell pipettes and little pipette pumps... a must have for larger prints and really not very expensive in the big picture.
    Are those glass or plastic? Plastic are fine and won't break if you drop them. Glass are good. I have always found that the pumps are a pain.

    Eric

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